MSSU France Semester

France Themed Semester Speakers

Dr. Barry Jean Ancelet:

 Dr. Barry Jean Ancelet:Dr. Barry Jean Ancelet is a professor of folklore and Francophone studies in the Department of Modern Languages, which he currently chairs, at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is a native Louisiana French-speaking Cajun and has given papers and published articles and books on various aspects of Louisiana’s Cajun and Creole cultures and languages. He has a doctorate in Études Créoles (anthropology and linguistics) from the Université de Provence (Aix-Marseille I). Dr. Ancelet is a member of France’s Palmes Académiques and Quebec’s Ordre des Francophones d’Amérique, and hosts the “Rendez-vous des Cadiens,” a weekly live radio show from the Liberty Theater in Eunice, La.

Presentations:

Negotiating the Mainstream: The Cajuns and Creoles of Louisiana
9:00 a.m., Monday, Aug. 28, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Deep Meanings in Small Places: Social and Community Values
in the Oral Tradition of French Louisiana
11:00 a.m., Monday, Aug. 28, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Cajun Music and Zydeco as Social Barometers
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Against the Tide (film)
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Michael W. Howell:

 Dr. Michael W. Howell:Dr. Michael W. Howell is professor of history at the College of the Ozarks near Branson, Mo. He received his Ph.D. at The University of North Carolina after studying in Paris on a Georges Lurcy Fellowship. Focusing on the political history of the Revolution, Dr. Howell draws on his article, “Danton, Roland, and Dugas: Politics, Bureaucracy, and Language in the French Revolution,” in The Historian for this presentation.

Presentations:

The French Revolution as Viewed
Through Both Ends of the Binoculars
10:00 a.m., Monday, Sept. 11, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Robert Tatham:

 Dr. Robert Tatham:Dr. Robert Tatham studied in the U.K. and worked in industry before moving to France where he obtained his doctorate at the Sorbonne in Paris. He has lectured for many years at the Université de Savoie at Chambéry, in the heart of the French Alps. He runs a number of international programmes for the IMUS Institute of Management and is interested in further developing the existing IMUS exchange with MSSU.

Presentations:

Eating Out: Restaurants and Fast Food in France
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2006
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

How Attractive are The Northern French Alps?
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2006
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Alan Singerman:

 Dr. Alan Singerman:Dr. Alan Singerman has taught French language, literature, civilization, and film at Davidson (N.C.) College since 1982. He has studied in Paris, Strasbourg, Freiburg (Germany), and Montpellier, where he received a master’s degree in film studies while directing Davidson’s study abroad program. His most recent work is a textbook on French cinema, Apprentissage du cinéma français. Livre de l’étudiant, which Focus Publishing has now also published in English under the title French Cinema: The Student's Book.

Presentations:

French Cinema: What Do You Know About It?
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 14, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Social Alienation in Contemporary French Cinema
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 14, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Mary Ann Caws:

 Dr. Mary Ann Caws:Dr. Mary Ann Caws is a Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature, English, and French at the Graduate School of the City University of New York. Her many areas of interest in 20th century avant-garde literature and art include Surrealism, poets René Char and André Breton, Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury group, and artists Robert Motherwell, Joseph Cornell, and Pablo Picasso. Conceptually, one of her primary themes has been the relationship between image and text. Dr. Caws’ books include Pablo Picasso (Critical Lives series), To the Boathouse: A Memoir, Marcel Proust (Illustrated Lives), Robert Motherwell with Pen and Brush, Virginia Woolf (Ilustrated Lives), Joseph Cornell’s Theater of the Mind, and Picasso’s Weeping Woman: The Life and Art of Dora Maar.

Presentations:

What’s Dada/Surrealism?
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 28, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Picasso’s Problem
10:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 29, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Mary McKinley:

 Dr. Mary McKinley:Dr. Mary McKinley is a professor of marketing at the Ecole Superieur de Commerce et Management (ESCEM) in Tours, France, where she is in charge of courses in strategic marketing, international marketing, green marketing, and consumer behavior. From 1992 to 2002, she lived in Budapest, Hungary and taught marketing, negotiations and conflict resolution, organizational communications, and business ethics at the International Management Center, the University of Economics and Pazmany Peter Catholic University. She is presently an adjunct professor at the Central European University in Budapest, where she teaches each summer. Dr. McKinley has had a long career in marketing and communications in such diverse fields as architecture, marketing research, public relations, higher education, politics, and environment. She has also worked for several agencies of the United Nations, USAID, and the European Commission. In 1996, the International Telecommunications Union in Geneva commissioned her to design the first WWW-based distance education university. Her work has taken her to more than 20 countries.

Presentations:

The Role of Politics and Culture in French Business
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2006
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Marketing in the 25 Countries of the
European Union — French Global Effects
12:00 p.m., Friday, Oct. 6, 2006
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Harriet Welty Rochefort:

 Dr. Harriet Welty Rochefort:Iowa native Harriet Welty Rochefort has lived in France since 1971. A freelance journalist and speaker, Ms. Rochefort is the author of two books about the French, French Toast, a humorous tale of Franco-American cultural differences based on her life in France, and French Fried, a memoir of French cuisine in which she divulges some of her French family’s favorite recipes. Both books were published by St. Martin’s Press. She is currently working on a third book about the French. Rochefort’s hobbies include reading, gardening, wine tasting, cooking, and yoga. Her favorite places are her own little garden in Paris and the terrace of any Paris café where she can watch the world go by.

Presentations:

Cultural Adjustments, or How to Survive
Without Ice Cubes and Air Conditioning
9:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

French Education, or Going to School the French Way
11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

French Bashing — What’s Behind It?
9:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 6, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

French Food — Why It’s Revered, Respected, and Relished
10:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 6, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Philippe Rochefort:

 Philippe Rochefort:Philippe Rochefort’s last position (1991-2005) was executive vice-president of Dexia Credit Local, a Franco-Belgian bank with a branch in the U.S. as well as a large insurance subsidiary. Dexia is No. 1 in the world for financing local authorities and is among the 20 largest European banks. Prior to joining Dexia, Mr. Rochefort held various positions within the French state-owned CDC Group, including chief financial officer of SCET, the holding company of several hundred French local subsidiaries (public transport, urban development companies, etc.). A graduate of the French “grandes écoles,” Mr. Rochefort has degrees both in engineering and economy and has taught economics for many years in several French universities, including the prestigious Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris. After retiring last year, Mr. Rochefort returned to school, earning a “licence” magna cum laude in history from the Sorbonne. He will begin work on his master’s degree this fall.

Presentations:

Corporate Rules and Working Habits in France
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2006
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Doing Business in France
6:00 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2006
Plaster Hall 102
Admission: free

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Dr. George Keck:

 Dr. George Keck:Dr. George Keck is a professor of music, chair of the Department of Music History and Literature, and director of the honors program at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Ark. He was awarded a Ph.D. in musicology from the University of Iowa and completed post-doctoral studies at Harvard University and Princeton University. Dr. Keck is the author of Francis Poulenc: A Bio-Bibliography and a frequent lecturer on French music, the composer Francis Poulenc, and 19th century American music.

Presentations:

Before the Parade Passes By: Erik Satie and Musical Modernism
1:00 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Francis Poulenc: The Man, The Music, The Legacy
7:30 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free 

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Dr. Felicia Hardison Londré:

 Dr. Felicia Hardison Londré:Dr. Felicia Hardison Londré is Curators’ Professor of Theatre at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, honorary co-founder of the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival, and dramaturg for the Nebraska Shakespeare Festival and Kansas City Actors Theatre. She specializes in French, Russian, and American theatre history and dramatic literature and Shakespeare production history. She has published 11 books and had lecture tours in France and Hungary. In 2001 she received the Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE) Outstanding Teacher Award. She was inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. in 1999.

Presentations:

City of Light and Dark: The Romantic Theatre in Paris
3:00 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 12, 2006
Balcony Lounge, Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Jeanne d’Arc and Jean Anouilh in French Theatrical Tradition
10:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 13, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Jean-Benoît Nadeau:

 Jean-Benoît Nadeau:Jean-Benoît Nadeau, author of the popular book Sixty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong, explained how the French see some of the challenges their country is facing in the 21st century, and why the problem is not always what outsiders, or even the French themselves, think it is. Combining historical analyses with his own observations, Nadeau explained what these “hot” issues actually mean to the French — from the question of “integrating” minorities to France’s place in the European Union, anti-Americanism, and the incursion of English — and why France’s attitude and solutions matter to the world.

Jean-Benoît Nadeau and his wife, Julie Barlow, are among the rare journalists who write for Canadian, American, and European publications in both English and French. They are award-winning contributors to Quebec’s national news magazine L’actualité, and their writing has appeared in The Christian Science Monitor, The International Herald Tribune, and the Courrier international. In 2003, Nadeau and Barlow published their critical and popular success, Sixty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong (Sourcebooks), which the London Daily Telegraph’s Paris correspondent Philip Delves Broughton praised for explaining, “better than anything else I have read, why the French are as they are.” Since then, it has sold 150,000 copies in English, French, Dutch, and Chinese. Nadeau is also the author of a humorous travelogue, Les français aussi ont un accent (Payot, 2002) while Julie Barlow recently published a travel guide on Montreal and Quebec for the For Dummies series (John Wiley and Sons, 2004). Based in Montreal, the couple is about to publish their next book together, The Story of French (St. Martin’s Press, November 2006).

Presentations: 

The Republique Fractured: How the
French Deal with Global Influence

9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2006
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Why France Remains Influential
7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Michael Mosher:

 Dr. Michael Mosher:Dr. Michael Mosher teaches European politics (with a special emphasis on France) and as well the politics of Japan at the University of Tulsa where he is chair of the political science department. A visiting professor at Yale in 1995 and in 1999-2000, Dr. Mosher was also in 1998-99 a member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton where he focused on the issue of globalization in France and Japan. Most recently he has been a visiting scholar at Centre d’Études et de Recherches Internationales (CERI), a research center which is part of the Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques (or “Sciences-Po” ) in Paris.

Presentations:

Le Divorce ou la Conciliation? France and
America in a Screwball Comedy of Remarriage

7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Jean-Jacques Moscarola:

 Jean-Jacques Moscarola:Dr. Jean-Jacques Moscarola is a professor of marketing and information/decision making systems at the University of Savoie in Annecy, France. He also serves as researcher and director of a technological research group applied to the observation of commercial mediations based on information and communication technologies. Dr. Moscarola founded Sphinx Development and in this capacity works with a variety of clients using his proprietary software to solve business needs. The software system includes data analysis, data mining and Internet surveys. He received his doctorate in applied economics from HEC Paris.

Presentations:

Can the Internet Be Absorbed Into Democracy?
The National Debate on the Future of the School System in France
11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2006
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. David Bell:

 Dr. David Bell:Dr. David Bell holds the Andrew W. Mellon Professorship in the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. In 2005, he was a visiting professor at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. He has published two principal books: Lawyers and Citizens: The Making of a Political Elite in Old Regime France (Oxford University Press, 1994), which won the Pinkney Prize of the Society for French Historical Studies, and The Cult of the Nation in France: Inventing Nationalism, 1680-1800 (Harvard University Press, 2001), which won the Gershoy Prize of the American Historical Association. In early 2007, Houghton Mifflin will publish his new book The First Total War: Napoleon’s Europe and the Birth of Warfare As We Know It.

Presentations:

The Significance of the French Revolution
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 2, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

The Crisis of French National Identity
7:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 2, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Marni Kessler:

Dr. Marni Kessler is an assistant professor of 19th Century European Art in the Kress Foundation Department of Art History at the University of Kansas. She received her Ph.D. from Yale University. Her forthcoming book Sheer Presence: The Veil in Manet’s Paris (University of Minnesota Press, 2006) links the phenomenon of the veil to modernist art practice, medical theories, French imperialism in North Africa, and architectural conditions in late 19th century Paris. She has published articles in Art Bulletin, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, and Woman’s Art Journal and has forthcoming essays in Picturing Power: The New York Chamber of Commerce, Portraiture, and its Uses.

Presentations:

Ocular Anxiety and the Pink Tea Cup:
Edgar Degas’ Woman with a Bandaged Eye

10:00 a.m., Friday, Nov. 10, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission free

Unmasking Manet’s Morisot
11:00 a.m., Friday, Nov. 10, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission free

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