Menu MSSU

Thailand Themed Semester Speakers

Gary Wintz photo by Grace Fritzinger Gary Wintz:

Gary Wintz has traveled to more than 220 countries in the last 40 years, researching, writing, photographing, and lecturing about distant lands and cultures. He has worked on NGO projects in Indochina, Indonesia, and Bangladesh, and has contributed his expertise to development projects in Ethiopia for UNICEF. In 1981-82, he taught at universities in both China and Tibet and lectured for the Soviet Academy of Sciences in 1989. Wintz has also lectured on Central Asia, Inner Asia, Southeast Asia and Thailand, and Buddhist themes, at many universities, including Harvard, Yale, Brown, Columbia, and Indiana, as well as on cruise ships and for the National Geographic Society at its headquarters in Washington, D.C. Wintz is a longtime member of the Mongolia Society, the Association for Asian Studies, the American Institute of Afghanistan Studies, and the Central Eurasian Studies Society as well as a number of Southeast Asian study groups, including the Thailand-Laos-Cambodia Studies Group and the Burma Studies Group (under the auspices of the AAS). As a tour leader, he has been a longtime leader of citizen diplomacy exchanges, including pioneering "Peace Trains" on the trans-Siberian during the Cold War days of the former Soviet Union. He has also been involved for many years with supporting humanitarian projects within Southeast Asia, and Thailand, such as the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST). (Gary Wintz photo by Grace Fritzinger)

Presentations:

Thailand 101: What Makes Thais Tick

9:00 a.m. Friday, Aug. 31, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Sit There Till You Get There: Enlightenment or Bust − Thai Style

10:00 a.m. Friday, Aug. 31, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Tourism in Thailand: Challenges in Paradise

12:00 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Don Moll: Don Moll:

Don Moll is a professor emeritus at Missouri State University, having retired in August 2010 after 33 years of teaching, research and graduate student mentoring in the university's Biology Department. He is a long-time member of the World Conservation Union's Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialists' Group. His main research interest is in chelonian ecology and conservation and he has conducted field research in North America, Central America, East Africa and Southeast Asia. Dr. Moll has presented and published many contributions in scientific and lay outlets and is senior author (with co-author/brother Edward) of The Ecology, Exploitation and Conservation of River Turtles, published by Oxford University Press in 2004. He is currently serving as Chelonian Section Editor for the online journal Herpetological Conservation and Biology.

Chitra chitra, the giant narrow-headed softshell, is a critically endangered turtle species known from only a few river systems of Southeast Asia. Dr. Moll became involved in a study of the natural history and captive breeding of this turtle in Thailand, through his participation in the Thai government's Royal Golden Jubilee Ph.D. Fellowship Program. He served as co-advisor of a Ph.D. student (Wachira Kitimasak) at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok who conducted this study as his graduate research project. Dr. Moll participated in organizing and conducting the field work and captive breeding program between 1998 and 2003.

Presentations:

Big Turtles in Big Trouble: The Giant Softshells of Thailand

9:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Saving Giant Softshelled Turtles in Thailand: A "Whole Technology" Captive Breeding and Head Starting Program

11:00 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Conrad Gubera: Conrad Gubera:

Dr. Conrad Gubera is a professor of sociology and international studies at Missouri Southern State University. He was named the university's Outstanding International Education Teacher in 2006 and the Outstanding Teacher in 1996. He teaches courses in sociology and anthropology, secondary social science education, and international studies. Dr. Gubera has been a faculty leader of 10 different student study abroad groups at MSSU, mostly recently teaching "The Sociology of Death and Dying" in London. Prior to that, he led groups to the lower Yucatan area of Mexico for a study of ancient Mayan sites.

During the past 25 years Dr. Gubera has engaged in extensive travel, visiting 31 countries. Most of his international travel has been the complement of being a fellow with the East-West Center at the University of Hawaii and the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, three separate Fulbright Awards, a Japan Foundation Award, and faculty grants through MSSU's Institute of International Studies.

Presentation:

Keeping Ghosts Happy: The Thai Spirit Houses

12:00 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

Noppadol Paothong: Noppadol Paothong:

Noppadol Paothong, a native of Bangkok, Thailand, started taking pictures at the age of 8 and joined a nature photography club in high school. When he came to North Idaho College in 1993, he couldn’t speak or write any English. He later joined the campus newspaper, and his photography prowess earned him a scholarship to Missouri Southern State University as director of photography for The Chart. After newsroom stints at the Joplin Globe and the Springfield News-Leader, he joined the Missouri Department of Conservation in 2006 as a wildlife photographer. Today, he is recognized as one of the finest nature photographers in the country.

Presentations:

From a City on a Continent 10,000 Miles Away to MSSU and the Great Outdoors

1:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission free

top

 Katherine Bowie: Katherine Bowie:

Katherine Bowie is a professor of anthropology and current director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has lived in Thailand eight years. An expert in village life, her research combines oral histories, participant-observation and interviews with archival sources. She completed her B.A. at Stanford University (1972) and her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago (1988). She has served as a Fulbright Scholar, Eisenhower Fellow, book review editor for Political and Legal Anthropology Review, president of the Midwest Conference on Asian Affairs (MCAA), and president of the Council of Thai Studies (COTS). Her publications include Voices from the Thai Countryside: The Necklace and Other Short Stories of Samruam Singh (University of Wisconsin Press, 1998); Rituals of National Loyalty: An Anthropology of the State and the Village Scout Movement in Thailand (Columbia University Press, 1997), and articles in Journal of Asian Studies, American Anthropologist, American Ethnologist, and Comparative Studies in Society and History. She teaches courses on cultural anthropology, political anthropology, historical anthropology, Theravada Buddhism and mainland Southeast Asian societies. Her research interests range from Thai peasant history and politics to her more recent work on gender and religion.

Presentations:

Thailand's Pioneering Role in the History of Women's Suffrage

10:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 21, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Village Life in Thailand

11:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 21, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Charles Keyes: Charles Keyes:

Charles Keyes, professor emeritus of anthropology and international studies at the University of Washington, has since the early 1960s carried out extensive research in Thailand, Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia on Buddhism and modernity, ethnicity and national cultures, and culture and "development."

He joined the faculty of the University of Washington in 1965 and subsequently served at this institution as chair of the department of anthropology (1985-1990 and 2007) and director of the center for Southeast Asian Studies (1986-1997). He has also had a long affiliation with the Faculty of Social Science at Chiang Mai University, including in 2011 holding an appointment as visiting professor with the Center for Ethnic Studies and the Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development at Chiang Mai University. His other appointments include that of visiting professor at Mahasarakham University in Thailand, Copenhagen University in Denmark, Gothenburg University in Sweden, the University of California in Los Angeles, and the National Museum of Ethnology in Osaka, Japan.

Professor Keyes has authored, edited or co-edited 15 books, monographs or special issues of journals and published over 80 articles. In his forthcoming book, From Peasant to Cosmopolitan Villagers: The Roots of Rural Populism in Northeastern Thailand, he traces the evolution of relationships between Lao-speaking rural people in northeastern Thailand and the Thai state from a millenarian uprising in 1902 to the electoral successes of populist parties in the first decade of the 21st century. This monograph will be published by Silkworm Books in Chiang Mai, jointly with the University of Washington Press. Dr. Keyes is also currently engaged together with his wife, Jane, in work on another book that is tentatively titled Return to Mae Sariang: Remembering the World of a Thai Frontier. This work, based on photos and notes from fieldwork in the late 1960s, explores how diverse ethnic and religious groups meeting on the "middle ground" of a frontier area near the Burma border engaged each other to shape a distinctive local world, one that when they undertook their research was more 19th than 20th or 21st century.

Presentations:

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium

Diversity, National Integration and the Questioning of "Thai-ness"

9:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium

From Peasant to Cosmopolitan Villagers: The Refiguring of the "Rural" in Northeastern Thailand

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Mark Mullenbach: Mark Mullenbach:

Dr. Mark Mullenbach is an associate professor of political science and director of the international studies program at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway. Born and raised in southern Minnesota, Dr. Mullenbach earned his B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Moorhead State University (Minnesota), Illinois State University, and the University of Arizona, respectively. In addition, Dr. Mullenbach worked as a congressional intern and legislative assistant (foreign and defense policy) for Congressman Timothy J. Penny (1st District, Minnesota) in Washington, D.C. from 1989-94. Dr. Mullenbach was hired by the UCA Department of Political Science in 2001 just prior to the successful defense of his doctoral dissertation, Third-Party Interventions in Intrastate Disputes in the Twentieth Century. Dr. Mullenbach's dissertation research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). Among other publications, Dr. Mullenbach's research has been published by International Studies Quarterly, International Interactions, and the Midsouth Political Science Review.

Presentations:

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium

Political Change and Instability in Thailand After the Cold War

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium

Government and Politics of Thailand in the 21st Century

9:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 28, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Marilyn Staff: Marilyn Staff:

Marilyn Downing Staff has been a traveler all her life. Her father, who worked in Calcutta for a time during her childhood, inspired her to explore Asia and she has never stopped. She is the founder of Asia Transpacific Journeys, a Boulder, Colorado-based tour operator specializing in cultural and educational travel to the Asia/Pacific region. She earned degrees in environmental biology and sociology before setting off on worldwide travels, including a stint living and studying in Thailand where her company was born 25 years ago. She is the veteran of far-flung adventures that span four decades and the most remote corners of the region. An accomplished photographer and engaging speaker, she's a frequent expert lecturer at museums, universities and conferences. She also founded Asia Transpacific Foundation, a non-profit organization that produces clean water filters for schools and impoverished villages. Her now grown son was adopted from Thailand.

Presentations:

Threads That Bind a Culture: Historical and Contemporary Thai Silk Textiles

9:00 a.m. Monday, Oct. 1, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Living on the Fringe: Hill Tribe Minorities in Contemporary Thailand

11:00 a.m. Monday, Oct. 1, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Love Knows No Bounds: A Thai Adoption Story

1:00 p.m. Monday, Oct. 1, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

Jim Lile:William Kumbier William Kumbier and Jim Lile:

Dr. William Kumbier is a professor of English and philosophy at Missouri Southern State University, where he has taught primarily writing and world literature since 1989. He has researched and written extensively on interactions between music and literature, publishing essays in Studies in Romanticism, Criticism, Comparative Literature, Blackwell's Literature Compass and elsewhere. He is currently working on essays that explore issues of subjectivity and animation in music, literature and film and has always been interested in the question of how cultures have been presented and represented to others.

Dr. Jim Lile is an associate professor of theatre and head of the Theatre Department and Art Department at Missouri Southern State University. He is co-editor of The Texas Theatre Journal to which he has contributed editorials and various other pieces. Dr. Lile teaches Theatre Appreciation and Theatre History. His primary research interest lies in 19th century American theatre and drama.

Presentation:

Can We Rely on The King and I?

11:00 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Thomas Rhoden: Thomas Rhoden:

Thomas Rhoden has lived and worked abroad since he was 20 in China, Czech Republic, Germany, India, and Thailand. Seven of those years were specifically in Thailand. He is a graduate of Webster University Thailand and the Thunderbird School of Global Management and a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (Thailand 2005-07). Rhoden is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in political science at Northern Illinois University (NIU) with an area concentration in Thailand and Burma through NIU's Center for Southeast Asian Studies. He is fluent in Thai and Lao and was awarded a federally-funded Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship to learn the Burmese language in Yangon, Myanmar in Summer 2012. Rhoden's most recent books include the epistolary account Burmese Refugees: Letters from the Thai-Burma Border and the more lighthearted travel guide Chiang Mai and Northern Thailand (Other Places Travel Guides). When not fretting over term papers in northern Illinois, Rhoden makes his home in Mae Sot, Thailand.

Presentations:

Thai Piracy on the High Seas and High-Tech Market

9:00 a.m. Friday, Oct. 12, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Volunteerism in Thailand: Getting Involved

11:00 a.m. Friday, Oct. 12, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Thai Language: Greetings and Script

1:00 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Dennis Schmitt: Dennis Schmitt:

Dennis Schmitt is the alumni professor of reproductive biology in the school of agriculture at Missouri State University and the Ringling Bros. chair of veterinary care and director of research. He received a D.V.M. and a Ph.D. in dairy science (reproductive physiology) from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is board certified in theriogenology (veterinary reproduction) and has served as a reproductive advisor for the AZA elephant TAG/SSP management group since 1987 and as the veterinary advisor from 1987-93. He is on the board of directors for the International Elephant Foundation and serves as its immediate past president. He is a member of the Asian Elephant Specialist Group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and a veterinary advisor for the Global Elephant Management Program.

Much of his work with elephants has been as a consultant for medical management and breeding programs at several zoo and circuses in North America. His work resulted in the first elephant produced from artificial insemination, at Dickerson Park Zoo in Springfield. Dr. Schmitt is currently coordinating several research projects funded by Ringling Bros. in Sri Lanka through the Ringling Bros. Center for Asian Elephant Research at Rajarata University in Sri Lanka and at the Ringling Bros Center for Elephant Conservation in Polk City, Florida. He has mentored several graduate students through the years investigating reproduction in various endangered species.

Presentations:

Where is the Elephant in the Room?

10:00 a.m. Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Shades of Gray: It's Not Black and White!

12:00 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Jim Lile: Jim Lile:

Dr. Jim Lile is an associate professor of theatre and head of the Theatre Department and Art Department at Missouri Southern State University. Dr. Lile teaches Theatre Appreciation and Theatre History. His primary research interest lies in 19th century American theatre and drama.

Presentation:

Nang Talung

11:00 a.m. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

top

 Ira Sukrungruang: Ira Sukrungruang:

Ira Sukrungruang is a Thai American, born and raised in Chicago. He received his M.F.A. from The Ohio State University and is the author of the memoir Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy. He is the coeditor of two anthologies on obesity: What Are You Looking At?: The First Fat Fiction Anthology and Scoot Over, Skinny: The Fat Nonfiction Anthology. His work has appeared in many literary journals, including Post RoadThe Sun, and Creative Nonfiction. He is the editor of Sweet: A Literary Confection (sweetlit.com), and teaches in the M.F.A. program at University of South Florida.

Talk Thai: Author Ira Sukrungruang will sign copies of his Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy and answer your questions in these informal sessions.
For more information about him, please visit www.sukrungruang.com.




Presentations:

The Immigrant Son: Confusion, Denial, Belonging, and Understanding

9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

What Is Home?

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Thai Boy Becomes a Monk

10:00 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Book Signings and Q&A with Ira Sukrungruang

11:00-11:30 a.m. and 1:00-2:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012
8:30-9:45 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012
Third floor of Spiva Library (by the fireplace)
Admission: free

top

©