MSSU Russia Semester

Russia Themed Semester Speakers

Dr. Yvonne Howell

 Dr. Yvonne HowellAfter graduating from Dartmouth College in 1981 with degrees in Russian and Biology, Dr. Yvonne Howell spent a year studying ornithology at Leningrad State University (now St. Petersburg). She left biology to enter the graduate program in Slavic Literature and Linguistics at the University of Michigan. While in graduate school, she learned the Czech language and spent 15 months in Prague studying the literature of the Czech underground. In 1987 she returned to Dartmouth College as a visiting instructor teaching Russian language and literature. She joined the faculty at the University of Richmond in 1991. She is the author of a book on Soviet science fiction (Apocalyptic Realism: The Science Fiction of Arkady and Boris Strugatsky) as well as numerous articles. She is currently writing a biography of the Russian geneticist V. P. Efroimson and his controversial theory of the “Genetics of Genius and the Biosocial Mechanisms of Higher Intellectual Activity.”

Dr. Yvonne Howard Presentation
9:00 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 1
Webster Hall 207
Permission of instructor required

Overview of Russia: Land, Language, People
11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 1
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

How Do Good Scientists Work With Bad Regimes?
11:00 a.m., Thursday., Sept. 2
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Joy Dworkin

 Dr. Yvonne HowellDr. Joy Dworkin, professor of English at Missouri Southern, studied in Leningrad, USSR, in the summer of 1980; twenty-four years later, she returned to the same city, now St. Petersburg, Russia. In what ways is it the same city? Professor Dworkin shared personal impressions of her visits to one of the world’s great cultural capitals, certainly one of the most literary cities in the world. Yes, McDonald’s and Subway are there now, and the propaganda “Long Live Leninism” that once glared down from atop skyscrapers has become the kitsch of the trendy “Call of Lenin” restaurant. Will aesthetic values survive in the new capitalist climate?

Visiting Reflections: From Leningrad 1980 to St. Petersburg 2004
12:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 3
Billingsly Student Center Room 310
Admission: faculty and staff only

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Dr. Tatiana Sildus

 Dr. Tatiana SildusDr. Tatiana Sildus holds a Ph.D. in language acquisition from Kansas State University and an M.A. from Vladimir State Pedagogical Institute. She serves as president of the Kansas Foreign Language Association and was the recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Student in Education and the Best of Kansas awards. Dr. Sildus taught German and her native Russian in a Kansas high school for several years.

All Work and No Play: Education the Russian Way
9:00 a.m, Friday, Sept. 10, 2004
Taylor Hall 113
Admission: free

When in Russia, Do as the Russians Do: A Closer
Look at Traditions, Customs, and Holidays

11:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 10, 2004
Taylor Hall 113
Admission: free

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Stanley Harrison

 Stanley HarrisonStanley Harrison has been training and teaching actors for more than 40 years. He is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama. In addition, he studied and worked with the directors of the national theatres of Denmark and Holland. As an actor, he has appeared in more than 30 roles. He has worked with Russian acting techniques both as an actor and teacher. His teacher, the late professor Constance Wech, studied with the great Russian actress Maria Ouspenskaya, so he was exposed to the Russian approach early in his career.

An Acting Workshop Based on the Teachings
of the Gret Russian Actor/Director Michael Chekhov

7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 14
Bud Walton Theatre
Admission: free

The Teachings of the Great Russian Acting
Teacher Konstantin Stanislavsky

10:00 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 15
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. John T. Alexander

 Dr. John T. AlexanderDr. John T. (Jay) Alexander is professor of history and Russian and East European Studies at the University of Kansas since 1966. He is best known for his biograhy of Catherine the Great: Life and Legend (Oxford, 1980), which was selected by several book clubs and has been reprinted in paperback and luxury editions. He has also published three other original books, three book-length translations from Russian, many journal articles, encyclopedia entries, and book reviews. He was one of the commentators of the History Channel production, Russia, Land of the Tsars, which has been broadcast in many different countries.

Catherine the Great: Life and Legend
6:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 16
Spiva Library 413A
Admission: free

Body and Soul: Peter the Great and Catherine the Great
9:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 17
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

A Russian Celebrity: Aleksander Pushkin
11:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 17
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Nina L. Khrushcheva

 Dr. Nina L. KhrushchevaGranddaughter of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, Dr. Nina L. Khrushcheva is a professor of media and culture in the graduate program of international affairs, senior fellow of the World Policy Institute at New School University, and adjunct associate professor at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. She is also senior editor of Project Syndicate: Association of Newspapers Around the World. After receiving her Ph.D. from Princeton University, she had a two-year appointment as a research fellow at the School of Historical Studies of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and then served as deputy editor of the East European Constitutional Review at the NYU School of Law. Dr. Khrushcheva’s numerous articles have appeared in The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, The Wall Street Journal, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Times Literary Supplement and other international publications. Her book Visiting Nabokov is forthcoming from Yale University Press in 2005.

Russian Reality, American Perceptions: A
Culture of Misunderstanding

9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 23, 2004
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Putin's Russia: Democracy Postponed or Democracy Defeated?
7:00 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 23, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Robert H. Donaldson

 Dr. Robert H. DonaldsonDr. Robert H. Donaldson is a professor of political science at the University of Tulsa, where he served as president from 1990-96. Previously (1984-90) Dr. Donaldson was president of Fairleigh Dickinson University, New Jersey's largest private university, and provost of Lehman College of the City University of New York (1981-84). He has also taught at Vanderbilt University and at Harvard University; the latter institution awarded his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science. Dr. Donaldson has authored or co-authored six books and monographs and more than two dozen articles and book chapters, mostly on the politics and foreign policy of the Soviet Union and Russia. His latest book, with Joseph Nogee, is The Foreign Policy of Russia: Changing Systems, Enduring Interests, 2nd edition published in 2001 by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. He is currently writing a book on the politics of “cyber-terrorism” and is teaching a course with the same name as part of Tulsa’s new Ph.D. program in Information Assurance.

Democracy or Autocracy: Where is Putin
taking Russia and Why Shouold We Care?

7:00 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 23, 3004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Dr. Ronald H. Donaldson Presentation
9:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 24, 2004
Webster Hall 207
Permission of instructor required

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Yevgengy Yevtushenko

 Yevgengy YevtushenkoYevgeny Yevtushenko, born in 1933 in Zima Junction, Siberia, is a poet, novelist, filmmaker, and professor of literature and cinema. His first poem was published in 1949, and his first book in 1952. His early poems were praised by Boris Pasternak, Carl Sandburg, and Robert Frost. Yevtushenko’s poetry became the first lonely voice against Stalinism. In 1960 he was the first Russian to break the Iron Curtain and to recite his poetry in the West. In 1961 he published “Babi Yar,” a poem against anti-Semitism, which inspired the great Russian composer Dmitry Shostakovich to write his Symphony No. 13. He raised his voice against dissidents’ trails, Soviet tanks in Czechoslovakia, and, together with the nuclear physicist Andrei Sakharov, he became a co-founder of the first Russian anti-Stalinist association “Memorial.”

From 1988 to 1991 Mr. Yevtushenko served in the first freely elected Russian Parliament, where he fought against censorship and other restrictions. During the 1991 attempt of hard-liners to overthrow the fragile Russian democracy, Yevtushenko recited his poetry from the balcony of the Russian White House to two hundred thousand defenders of freedom.

Mr. Yevtushenko now divides his time between Russia and teaching poetry to American students at Queens College, New York, and the University of Tulsa. He has toured more than 90 countries and his works have been translated into 72 languages. He was elected Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and Member of the European Academy of Arts and Sciences. On March 17, 2004, Mr. Yevtushenko was awarded the highest medal of Russia “For the Great Achievements for Motherland” for his literary works.

Between the City of Yes and the City of No
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 30, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Question & Answer Session
1:00 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 30, 2004
Spiva Libray Room 413
Admission: free

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Dr. David Kushner

 Dr. David KushnerDr. David Kushner directs graduate seminars in American music, nationalism in music, music criticism, 19th century music, 20th century music, piano literature, chamber music literature, and opera history at the University of Florida. He holds a Ph.D. in music from the University of Michigan and has lectured and performed throughout the United States and in Canada, Israel, Kenya, Australia, and in eastern and western Europe. In 1998, he was a visiting professor of musicology at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Professor Kushner also has been recognized for his “Recitals in the Schools” program, which brings art music to students in the elementary, middle, and high schools.

Modest Mussorgsky: Nationalist, Realist, 'Barbaric' Genius
8:00 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 7, 2004
Phinney Recital Hall
Admission: free

Aleksander Borodin: Chemist and Composer
8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 8, 2004
Phinney Recital Hall
Admission: free

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Carolyn Trout

Carolyn Trout, director of the Joplin Public Library, has been creating Ukrainian Easter eggs (pysanky) for 25 years. This ancient art form uses egg shells, beeswax, and water-soluble dyes to create masterpieces in miniature. The wax-resist process is a complicated version of the method used by children to dye eggs for Easter egg hunts. Pysanky have both social and spiritual significance in Ukrainian culture, where both the creation and giving of the completed eggs is an integral part of the traditions of Easter. Pysanky have been discovered in Ukrainian graves that date back thousands of years. Prior to the Christianization of the Ukraine near the end of the first millennium A.D., the designs and colors had different symbolic meaning. For example, the triangle — a standard design element on many pysanky — now represents the Holy Trinity, but in pre-Christian Ukraine it stood for either the elements (fire, earth, water) or for the family (father, mother, child.) The most common design element is the eight-pointed star, or rose, which symbolizes life. Designs from the Ukrainian steppes tend to use more floral and animal imagery, while designs from the Carpathian mountains tend to be more geometric.

Pysanky: The Art of the Ukranian Easter Egg
12:00 p.m., Friday, Oct. 8, 2004
Billingsly Student Center Room 310
Brown bag presentation, faculty and staff only

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Dr. Sidney Monas 

 Dr. Sidney Monas Born in New York to Russian-Jewish immigrants, Dr. Sidney Monas grew up in rural eastern Pennsylvania. After his first year at Princeton, the U.S. Army sent him to Europe, where he was captured and spent several months as a German prisoner of war. His Harvard dissertation, published as his first book in 1961, addressed Russian society and police under Nicholas I. After spending most of his early career teaching at Rochester University, he came to the University of Texas in 1969. Throughout his life, Dr. Monas has maintained an interest in literature, history, and world affairs.

The Iconic Tendency in Russian Culture and Politics
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Dr. Sidney Monas Presentation
1:00 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2004
Hearnes Hall 322B
Permission of instructor required

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Dr. Elena Osokina

 Dr. Elena OsokinaDr. Elena Osokina received her Ph.D. from Moscow State University in 1998. She has been a visiting scholar at Maison des Sciences de l’Homme in Paris, a senior research associate in the Institute of Russian History at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, a post-doctoral fellow at the Davis Center for Russian Studies at Harvard University, and a visiting lecturer at Donaueschingen Academy in Germany. She has given presentations at the Russian and East-European Centers of Berkeley, Chicago, Columbia, Duke, Georgetown, Harvard, Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Indiana, North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Princeton, Stanford, Pittsburgh, Boston College, Library of Congress, University of Aberdeen (Great Britain), University of Helsinki (Finland), and University of Toronto. Her book, Our Daily Bread: Socialist Distribution and the Art of Survival in Stalin’s Russia, 1927-1941, was published in 2001.

Stalin's Gold, Industrialization and Soviet Everyday Life
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2004
Webster Hall 207
Permission of instructor required

Women in a Totaliarian Society: Soviet Union,
Late 1920's - Early 1940s

11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Charles Brough

 Charles BroughJoplin author/journalist Charles Brough presented the story of the dramatic love affair between Rachmaninoff and Diva Nina Koshetz, an affair which began in Imperial Russia during its Golden Age of the Arts. Brough describes the dramatic moment when Rachmaninoff first took Koshetz in his arms, the difficulties and separation that ultimately ensued, and her harrowing escape from Russia at the time of the Revolution. She hid all her jewels in her baby daughter’s diapers, and eventually reached exile in the U.S. Once here, she went on to build a new singing career in opera, performing at Carnegie Hall eight times, at the White House for President Harding, and in several Hollywood movies. Brough also painted a riveting word picture of Rachmaninoff and Koshetz’s final meeting, called “the encounter on the bridge.” Her daughter, Marina, also became an opera singer, appearing at the Hollywood Bowl with Stowkowski and in numerous Hollywood MGM musicals with Mario Lanza. The presentation included photographs, short musical clips, and movie and video segments.

Charles Brough took on the task of editing Nina Koshetz’s Memoirs for Marina. The task appealed to him not only because it involved a love story but also because it wove around so many of the great Russian artists. The job involved assembling and editing 1,000 pages of translated diary notes that were undated and in no consecutive order. Following his book, The Cycle of Civilization, he is now working with his literary agent on his culminating work explaining why civilizations rise and fall. A one-time member and public speaker of the UCLA Plato Society, Brough is married to Joanne Walker Brough, a prominent CBS and Lorimar television executive and producer of “Falcon Crest.” Joanne Brough is an adjunct professor of communication at Missouri Southern.

The Last Love Song
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Jennifer Wynot

 Dr. Jennifer WynotDr. Jennifer Wynot received her Ph.D. in Russian history from Emory University in Atlanta in 2000. She conducted research in Russia in 1996 and 1998, and traveled back for a short visit in 2002. While in Russia, she was privileged to stay in several monasteries and witness the canonization of several saints. Dr. Wynot has been teaching European, Russian, and Middle Eastern history at Metropolitan State College of Denver since 2001. She received a Fulbright to travel to Egypt in summer 2004 to work on a project on Coptic monasticism. Her book, Keeping the Faith: Russian Orthodox Monasticism in the Soviet Union, 1917-1939, was published in 2004 by Texas A&M University Press, and she is currently working on a second book on a comprehensive history of Russian monasticism.

Religion after Communism: The Status of the
Russian Orthodox Church in Post-Communist Russia

9:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 25, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Dr. Jennifer Wynot Presentation
11:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 25, 2004
Hearnes Hall 311
Permission of instructor required

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Dr. Maxim Matusevich

 Dr. Maxim MatusevichDr. Maxim Matusevich teaches courses on Africa, Cold War, and Russian/Soviet cultural history at Drury University. He is a native of St. Petersburg, Russia, where he worked and published extensively as a journalist. He taught on the college level in Russia, Nigeria, and the United States. Dr. Matusevich is the author of No Easy Row for a Russian Hoe: Ideology and Pragmatism in Nigerian-Soviet Relations (2003) as well as dozens of articles and book chapters. His second scholarly book, Africa in Russia, Russia in Africa: 300 Years of Encounters, is due for release later this year. Dr. Matusevich has an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois.

Having Guts to Disagree: Political and Cultural
Dissent in the Soviet Union

10:00 a.m, Monday, Nov. 1, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Rituals of Everyday Life in the Soviet Union
11:00 a.m, Monday, Nov. 1, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Rostyslav Lukach

 Rostyslav LukachRostyslav Lukach has more than 20 years of hands-on experience as an entrepreneur and manager of investments. He specializes in privatization, stock market dealing, and corporate governance, and provides strategic development, marketing, and public relations consultancy services to small and medium-sized enterprises in the Ukraine. He received a degree in economics from the State Economic Institute in Odessa in 1981 and has skills as a journalist.

Transition from Command to Market Economy
11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 3
Cornell Auditorium in Matthews Hall
Admission: free

Rostylav Lukach Presentation
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 4, 2004
9:00 and 11:00 a.m., Friday, Nov. 5, 2004
11:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m., Monday, Nov. 8, 2004
Matthews Hall
Permission of Instructor Required

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Dr. Charles Timberlake

 Dr. Charles TimberlakeDr. Charles Timberlake, professor emeritus of Russia history at the University of Missouri, began with an analysis of the Constitution of 1993 that created the current governmental structure (the “prize” for the winner of elections) and the results of parliamentary and presidential elections from 1993 to 2004. He described the antidemocratic acts of the Putin presidency: revision of the constitution to consolidate 89 regions into 7, whose “Presidential representatives” he has appointed from his former KGB buddies; recentralization of power in the hands of the executive by administrative reforms; use of the compliant legal institutions to punish severely all people outside the “family circle” that he inherited from Yeltsin; and widespread attacks on all media that have been critical of him. Professor Timberlake ended with the question of a third four-year term for Putin, beginning in 2008.

Dr. Charles Timberlake was chair of the History Department at the University of Missouri from 1996-2000. He has taught such courses as “Russia from Peter the Great to Lenin,” “Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1917,” “The Russian Revolution, 1885 1921,” “U.S. Soviet Relations since the 1970s,” “The Soviet Union Under Stalin,” “The Soviet Union Since Stalin,” and “Soviet Union & Russia Since Gorbachev.” Dr. Timberlake received the University of Missouri Provost Award for Leadership in International Education in 2002 and the Distinguished Faculty Award from the University of Missouri Alumni Association in 2000. He has been a visiting professor at universities in Russia, Finland, England, China, and the Republic of Georgia.

The Prospects for Russia's Evolution into a Western-Style Democracy
10:00 a.m., Monday, Nov. 8, 2004
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Michael Makin

 Dr. Michael MakinDr. Michael Makin teaches Russian literature and culture at the University of Michigan. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford. Makin is the author of Marina Tsvetaeva: Poetics of Appropriation (Oxford University Press, 1993; Russian edition, Moscow, 1997), the editor of two volumes of scholarly essays, and has published academic articles in America, England, and Russia. He has just completed a book on Nikolai Klyuev, who like Tsvetaeva, is one of the great and tragic Russian poets of the first half of the 20th century. He travels to Russia regularly, visiting many parts of the country, especially the Russian north.

New Moscow, Old Heartland -- Contrasts of Russia Today
9:00 a.m.,Wednesday, Nov. 10
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Poet and Power: The Story of Nikolai Klyuev
1:00 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 10
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

The Literature of St. Petersburg
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 11
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Alina Makin

 Alina MakinAlina Makin is a faculty member in the Slavic Department at the University of Michigan. A native Muscovite, she was educated at the Moscow Linguistics University. At the University of Michigan, where she has worked for over a decade, she directs the Intensive Russian Program and teaches beginning through advanced levels of Russian, as well as advanced Russian seminars on the history and culture of the Russian table and other aspects of Russian culture. Her research interests include several areas of applied linguistics, especially second-language acquisition and pedagogy, and the history and culture of food and cooking.

Culture of the Russian Table
11:00 a.m.,Wednesday, Nov. 10
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Russian Women Today
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 11
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Carla Stalling Huntington

 Carla Stalling HuntingtonCarla Stalling Huntington, an assistant professor of marketing and management at Missouri Southern, discusses the advent of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes formed in the early 1900s and its ultimate demise by the late 1920s. Diaghilev’s company, which originated in Russia although it never performed there, has been called “the progenitor of modern ballet.” Many ballet companies of the first half of the 20th century — in England, France, Argentina, and elsewhere — were either founded by veterans of the Ballets Russes or were rejuvenated by Ballets Russes alumni. In the United States, the Ballets Russes was instrumental in helping to form the New York City Ballet (and therefore later companies in the U.S. that recruited dancers from the New York City Ballet). Professor Huntington will also discuss the founder of the New York City Ballet, George Balanchine, who had been a dancer in Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes and a choreographer for the Ballet Russe and for the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo. The presentation will include information about the economics of the dance companies as well as a demonstration of the dance methodology.

Dr. Huntington’s research emphasizes the history, marketing, economics and management of professional ballet. Her goal in focusing on these areas of research is to influence the formulation of effective policy and increasing demand in the professional ballet industry. She has published “Ninette de Valois, Lydia Lopokova and John Maynard Keynes, III: Economics and Ballet in London 1932 – 1942” in the 2003 Proceedings of the Society of Dance History Scholars. Aside from her research interests, Professor Huntington continues to dance and has done so for more than 25 years. She also launched and led a small performing professional ballet company in southern California.

The Ballet Russe
2:00 p.m., Friday, Nov. 19, 2004
Bud Walton Theatre
Admission: free

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Dr. Gary McGrath

Dr. Gary McGrath, a professor of mathematics at Pittsburg State University, speaks on "Euler and the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences" as part of MSSU's Math and Science Seminar Series. The Academy of Sciences was established in St. Petersburg in 1724 following an order of Peter the Great. Leonard Euler (1707-1783), who started working at the Academy when he was 20 years old, made substantial contributions in modern analytic geometry and trigonometry.

Euler and the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences
4:00 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 1, 2004
Reynolds Hall 232
Admission: free

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