MSSU Mexico Semester

Mexico Themed Semester Speakers

Dr. Danny Anderson:

Dr. Danny Anderson:Dr. Danny Anderson, chair of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Kansas, joined the KU faculty in 1988. His research focuses on Latin American literature with an emphasis on Mexico. He has published Vicente Leñero: The Novelist as Critic (1989) and Cultural Studies in the Curriculum: Teaching Latin American (2003), a volume of essays about teaching co-edited with Jill Kuhnheim. His articles have appeared in various books and journals. He is the editor for Pan-American Literature in Translation for the University of Texas Press. He is completing a book on the social and cultural history of reading in Mexico in the late 19th and 20th centuries.

Presentations:

Reading, Revolution, Modernity in Mexico: The Meanings of Literacy
10:00 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Tlatelolco: Cultural Memory and the Mexican Student Movement of 1968
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Patrick Peritore:

 Dr. Patrick Peritore:Dr. Patrick Peritore is a professor of political science at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He also has taught at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, the University of Sibiu in Romania, and the National University of Argentina at Tucuman, and done fieldwork in eight countries, but principally Mexico, Brazil, Nicaragua, and India. He wrote Socialism, Communism and Liberation Theology in Brazil (Ohio University Press 1990), Biotechnology in Latin America: Politics, Impacts, and Risks (Scholarly Resources 1995), and Third World Environmentalism in the Postmodern Age (U. Press of Florida 1999), and has finished a book on Greek philosophy, a textbook on political theory, and a book on ancient Greek democracy.

Presentations:

Postmodern Politics and Mexican Development
9:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 9, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Mexico's Environmental Politics
11:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 9, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Víctor M. Macías-González:

 Dr. Víctor M. Macías-González:Dr. Víctor M. Macías-González is an associate professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He is also the director of the Institute for Latina/o and Latin American Studies, which promotes an understanding of Latin America, facilitates contact among professors with Latin American specialties, seeks to respond to student and community groups, and presents speakers and other programs. Dr. Macías-González’s teaching and research interests include Hispanic cultural studies, particularly the areas of gender, sexuality, and class; Hispanic letters and early modern Europe.

Presentations:

Class in Mexican History and Culture
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Gender and Sexuality in Mexican History and Culture
1:00 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Armand Peschard-Sverdrup:

 Armand Peschard-Sverdrup:Armand Peschard-Sverdrup is regarded as one of the leading experts on Mexican politics in the United States and Mexico. He was the only U.S. analyst invited to the White House State Dinner in honor of President Vicente Fox in September 2001. His specialization derives from having focused on Mexico for the past 11 years at the prestigious Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, D.C., where he serves as the director of the Mexico Project. In that capacity, he has been responsible for analysis of Mexico’s domestic politics, trade and investment, border security and the broad range of issues that comprise the U.S.-Mexico bilateral relationship. As a result of Peschard-Sverdrup’s daily focus on Mexico, he has developed an invaluable network of high-level political and business contacts spanning federal, state, and municipals levels of government and industry.

Peschard-Sverdrup was born in Mexico City and is fluent both in the language and the culture of Mexico. He did graduate work in government at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, Center for Latin American Studies, in Washington, D.C., and did his undergraduate work in political science and economics at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

He is regularly asked to brief U.S. and Mexican government officials and corporate executives and has provided a one-on-one briefing to Tom Ridge, director of the then-White House Office of Homeland Security, prior to his March 2002 trip to Mexico; and a one-on-one briefing to Tony Garza, U.S. ambassador to Mexico, in preparation for his posting.

Peschard-Sverdrup is recognized as one of the leading opinion leaders on Mexican issues and is regularly quoted in television, print, and radio media, both in the United States and Mexico. He is a guest lecturer at both the Mexican Advanced Area Studies Seminar at the Foreign Service Institute of the U.S. Department of State and at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.

Presentations:

U.S.-Mexico Relations: From Drugs & Thugs to a More Strategic Partnership
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, September 20, 2005
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Mexican Politics: Countdown to the 2006 Presidential Elections
7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Loretta Bondì:

  Loretta Bondì:Loretta Bondì is an independent researcher and advocate focusing on international security, international organizations and coalitions, human rights, U.N. and regional sanctions, and the arms trade. She directed the Cooperative Security Program at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University (SAIS), Center for Transatlantic Relations. Ms. Bondì was also a member of the Resource Group advising the U.N. High Level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change; an expert for the group advising the U.N. Secretariat and Security Council on targeted sanctions; and a mentor for the Center for the Study of the Presidency Fellows program.

Ms. Bondì has studied issues relating to international security, human rights, targeted sanctions, and arms control and pursued them in advocacy with NATO, the United Nations, the Organization of African Unity, the European Union institutions, the G8, and several governments and organizations around the world. She is a co-founder and a leading member of the International Action Network on Small Arms, an international coalition of 650 NGOs, and has participated in campaigns ranging from conflict diamonds, to child soldiers, and to the International Criminal Court.

Her publications include Beyond the Border and Across the Atlantic: Mexico’s Foreign and Security Policy Post-September 11th (Johns Hopkins University Center for Transatlantic Relations, 2004). She has lectured widely in the U.S. and elsewhere. Her research and advocacy activities have been featured by all major newswire services, and by print media such as The Washington Post, The New York Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Washington Times, The San Diego Union and Tribune, Le Monde (Paris); The Sunday Times (London), The Observer (London), Le Soir (Brussels), L’Unita’ (Rome), the Asahi Shimbun (Tokyo), The Mail and Guardian (Johannesburg), Itogi (Moscow), El Financiero and El Universal (Mexico City); ABC (Asunción); El Tiempo (Caracas), as well as by broadcast media including CNN, BBC, the Canadian, Australian, and Swedish Broadcasting Corporations, Radio France Internationale, Radio Vaticana, Radio Netherlands, Voice of America, and Radio Suisse Internationale.

Presentations:

Medium-size Powers and Multilateral Action: The Case of Mexico
7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Christopher Powell:

 Christopher Powell:An archaeologist with 20 years in the field, Christopher Powell has worked all over the Maya world, both in the ruins and with the modern Maya people. After a decade of contract and research archaeology in the United States, Powell shifted his focus to Mesoamerica. From 1993-96 he worked at Copan, Honduras, where he excavated the richly decorated tomb of Copan’s lineage founder, Yax K’uk’ Mo, the tomb of his queen, and the tomb of a sacrifical burial of a tlaloc style warrior. His work at Copan was featured in the December 1997 issue of National Geographic Magazine. His current focus is on the completion of his Ph.D. dissertation, "The Shapes of Sacred Space," which will present his revolutionary new theories regarding Maya geometry and explain how the Maya, both ancient and modern, incorporate the proportions of nature in their art and architecture.

Presentations:

Maya History: Culture Origins to Spanish Conquest
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: Free

Maya Archaeoastronomy
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 22, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: Free

Maya Sacred Geometry
11:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 23, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: Free

 

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Dr. Edwin Barnhart:

 Dr. Edwin Barnhart:Dr. Edwin Barnhart, director of the Maya Exploration Center, has over a decade of experience in Mesoamerica as an archaeologist, explorer, and instructor. He has published over a dozen papers and given presentations at five international conferences. In 1994 he began working as a surveyor and a University of Texas field school instructor in the jungles of northwestern Belize. After finding numerous small villages, Dr. Barnhart discovered the ancient city of Ma’ax Na (Monkey House), a major center of the Classic Maya Period. He mapped over 600 structures at Ma’ax Na between 1995-97 before moving his research focus to Chiapas, Mexico. He was invited by the Mexican government to direct the Palenque Mapping Project, a three-year effort to survey and map the unknown sections of Palenque’s ruins. Over 1,100 new structures were documented, bringing the site total to almost 1,500. The resultant map has been celebrated as one of the most detailed and accurate ever made of a Maya ruin.

Presentations:

Maya Calendar Systems
1:00 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: Free

The Tomb of Pakal: Great King of the Ancient Maya
10:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 23, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: Free

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Dr. Robert Hoover:

 Dr. Robert Hoover:Dr. Robert Hoover is a professor of marketing in the College of Business at Idaho State University. His international business background spans some three decades as an entrepreneur, researcher, teacher, and consultant. His work has included involvement in Mexico, Costa Rica, Honduras, Uruguay, France, Portugal, Finland, Morocco, New Zealand, and Ireland. Dr. Hoover was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to Uruguay in Spring 2005.

Presentations:

Marketing in Mexico: Why the Differences are Critical
10:00 a.m., Monday, Sept. 26, 2005
Cornell Auditorium in Matthews Hall
Admission: free

Doing Business in Mexico
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Monday, Sept. 26, 2005
Billingsly Student Center, Room 310
Admission: $10

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Dr. Marye Tharp:

 Dr. Marye Tharp:In addition to teaching posts in Mexico, Texas, and Boston, Dr. Marye Tharp has taught summer and executive education courses in 19 countries in Latin America, Asia, North America, and Europe. She is the author of numerous articles and books in the fields of international and multicultural marketing and marketing communication. Her most recent book is Marketing and Consumer Identify in Multicultural America (Sage, 2001).

Presentations:

Marketing in Mexico: Why the Differences are Critical
10:00 a.m., Monday, Sept. 26, 2005
Cornell Auditorium in Matthews Hall
Admission: free

Doing Business in Mexico
11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Monday, Sept. 26, 2005
Billingsly Student Center, Room 310
Admission: $10

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Dr. John Chuchiak IV:

 Dr. John Chuchiak IV:Dr. John Chuchiak IV is assistant professor of colonial Latin American history and coordinator of the Latin American studies minor in the History Department of Missouri State University. He received his Ph.D. from Tulane University (2000); his dissertation, “The Indian Inquisition and the Extirpation of Idolatry: The Process of Punishment in the Provisorato de Indios in the Colonial Diocese of Yucatán, 1569-1812,” is under review for publication. His research specialty is in colonial Latin American history with specific research interests in the colonial and ecclesiastical history of México, the history of the Franciscan order in Yucatán, and colonial Maya ethnohistory.

Presentations:

¿(Un)Friendly Neighbors? U.S.-Mexican Relations in Historical
Perspective: Understanding the Differences of Proximity
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2005
Justice Center Auditorium
Admission: free

Hernan Cortes and the Aztec Conquest: The Making of Mexico
2:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2005
Webster Hall 223
Admission: free

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Dr. Winfield J. Burggraaff:

 Dr. Winfield J. Burggraaff:Dr. Winfield J. Burggraaff, emeritus professor of history at the University of Missouri-Columbia., received his A.B. from Hope College and his Ph.D. in Latin American history from the University of New Mexico. Since 1966 he has been on the history faculty at the University of Missouri, teaching a broad range of courses on the history of Latin America and the Caribbean, including a frequently taught course on the history of Mexico, 1519 to the present day. Although he retired in 2001, he continued teaching part-time through 2004. Dr. Burggraaff has served as history department chair, interim director of MU’s International Center, and president of the Midwest Association for Latin American Studies (MALAS). He has researched and traveled extensively in South America, the Caribbean, and Mexico.

Presentations: 

Mexico: Our Distant Neighbor
9:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 10, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Trouble on Our Border: Mexico and the U.S. at the Turn of the 21st Century
11:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 10, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Guillermo DeLeon:

 Guillermo DeLeon:Guillermo DeLeon is originally from San Benito, Texas. He has written and produced over 30 plays for the stage including Leyendas de Mis Abuelos, Sex Starved Monkeys, and most recently, Spic. In 1999, as part of a cultural exchange program, his play Bruja was selected for a short tour of Mexico by Texas A&M University. As well as being a playwright, Mr. DeLeon is also an accomplished actor, director, and improvisor. He is represented by the Peggy Taylor Talent agency in Dallas, Texas. Currently, he lives in Lakeway, Texas.

Presentations:

Culture Shock: A Perspective on the Mexican/American Dream
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Andrew Wood:

 Dr. Andrew Wood:Dr. Andrew Wood is an assistant professor of history and director of the International Studies Certificate Program at the University of Tulsa. He received the Thomas F. Buckley College of Arts and Sciences Award for Teaching Excellence in 2004. He is the author of Revolution in the Street: Women, Workers and Urban Protest in Veracruz, 1870-1927 (Scholarly Resources Inc/Rowman and Littlefield, 2001), which won the 1999 Michael C. Meyer Prize for best first manuscript in Latin American History and the 2002 Thomas F. McGann Prize from the Rocky Mountain Council on Latin American Studies. He is editor and contributor to On The Border: Society and Culture Between the U.S. and Mexico (Scholarly Resources/Rowman and Littlefield, 2004). He is currently finishing three book projects including a biography of Mexican songwriter Agustín Lara, an illustrated study (and documentary film) on Carnival in Veracruz as well as a co-edited a volume on tourism in Mexico.

Presentations:

What Difference did the Mexican Revolution Make?: Official and Revisionist Interpretations
9:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 21, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Marketing Mexican Popular Culture for the 21st Century: Tradition and Traditionalism
11:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 21, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. John McDowell:

 Dr. John McDowell:Dr. John McDowell, professor of folklore and ethnomusicology at Indiana University, has been on the trail of the corrido, Mexico’s popular ballad form, for more than a quarter of a century. His book, Poetry and Violence: The Ballad Tradition of Mexico’s Costa Chica, was published by the University of Illinois Press in 2000. As a folklorist steeped in the ethnography of performance and communication, Dr. McDowell has studied on three continents and an island or two, and in homes, plazas, churches, and cabildos in dozens of villages, towns and cities.

Presentations:

Songs of Passion and Strife
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Poetry and Violence in the Ballads of Mexico's Costa Chica
1:00 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2005
Cornell Auditorium in Matthews Hall
Admission: free

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