MSSU Mexico Semester

Mexico Concerts and Theatrical Events

Theatre:
Concerts:

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Theatre:

Southern Theatre presents: Faena  Southern Theatre presents: Faena

7:30 p.m., Tues.-Sat., Oct. 11-15, 2005
Bud Walton Theatre
Admission: free to students, faculty, staff;
$3 for adults;
$1 for senior citizens and high school students

In this obra de teatro, deeply rooted in Hispanic tradition, a young girl’s awakening sense of duty compels her to follow in the footsteps of her matador father. Reality is interlaced with mysticism as Faena and her family, poised between the natural and the supernatural, seek to discover whether their destiny is revenge or redemption. Southern Theatre is pleased to celebrate the Mexico Semester with the premiere production of this exciting new play by Guillermo DeLeon, who was in residence at MSSU. Directed by Jim Lile, assistant professor of theatre.

Top  Celebración

Celebración

7:00 p.m., Monday, Oct. 17, 2005
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Missouri Southern’s Spanish Club presented Celebración, a night of Mexican, Spanish and Latin American literature, dance, art, music, and theatre. The program was in both English and Spanish.

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El Grupo Folklorico Atotonilco

 El Grupo Folklorico Atotonilco7:00 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 20, 2005
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Founded in Kansas City by Maria Chaurand in 1979, El Grupo Folklorico Atotonilco has established a reputation as one of the best Mexican folk dance companies in the United States. Boasting 85 members ranging in age from 5 to 40, El Grupo Folklorico Atotonilco is the most highly requested dance group in the state of Missouri’s folk arts roster. The dance company had the honor of representing the U.S. at the 1992 World’s Fair in Seville, Spain.

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Ballet Folklorico Tierra Mestiza

2:30 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 23, 2005  Ballet Folklorico Tierra Mestiza
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Ballet Folklorico Tierra Mestiza is dedicated to maintaining the beauty, traditions, and culture of Mexico and other Caribbean countries. Formed in 2001 in Tulsa to promote Mexican culture and to preserve traditional Mexican folk dances and costumes, the group features 26 dancers ranging in age from 6 to 14. Dances and culture from the Mexican states of Veracruz, Hidalgo, Michoacan, Tamulipas, Sinaloa, and Jalisco and the countries of Colombia, Nicaragua and Venezuela are highlighted in the group’s performances. Dance students are from the Tulsa area and most have family roots in various parts of Mexico.

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The Norahua Mexican Folkloric Dancers of Oklahoma  The Norahua Mexican Folkloric Dancers of Oklahoma

7:00 p.m., Friday, Nov. 11, 2005
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Norahua Mexican Folkloric Dancers of Oklahoma combine color and the festive spirit of Old Mexico in a series of folk dances to folkloric music from 14 different Mexican states, including Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas, Tabasco, Veracruz, Yucatan and Baja California. Complementing their performances are authentic, colorful costumes.

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Concerts:

Marimba Sol De Chiapas

 Marimba Sol De Chiapas7:00 p.m., Monday, Sept. 19, 2005
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

A professional folkloric ensemble based in Kansas City since 1991, Marimba Sol de Chiapas is committed to the authentic performance and spirit of the marimba heard throughout Southern Mexico and Central America. From the lively and complex crossing rhythms of traditional dances to poignant and alluring romantic ballads, this music offers something for everyone. Marimba Sol de Chiapas has been featured at several “Plaza LIVE!” performances at Kansas City’s Country Club Plaza and at the Second Annual Fiesta Mexicana at Kansas City’s Union Station. The group consists of John Currey, director; James Schank; James Clanton; and Brian Fronzaglia.

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Mariachi Tulsa

 Mariachi Tulsa10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 30, 2005
Campus oval
Admission: $5; free to students and faculty

Mariachi Tulsa provided the music during Missouri Southern’s Homecoming campus picnic. Founded in 1992 by five musicians from the states of Chihuahua and San Luis Potosí in Mexico, the band recorded CDs in 1997 and 2004. Mariachi Tulsa has performed throughout Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Kansas, and Missouri. Its outfits are traditional clothing from Guadalajara, Mexico.

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Los Cenzontles

 Los Cenzontles7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2005
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Los Cenzontles (“The Mockingbirds”) is a 7-10 member Mexican folk ensemble that celebrates the innovation and imagination of traditional Mexican music and dance, weaving together centuries-old musical traditions with contemporary sounds of the world stage. Under the direction of Grammy-nominated producer Eugene Rodriguez, this group presents authentic and gutsy interpretations of traditional, vernacular and original music in a uniquely personal manner. Based in San Pablo, California, the group features four distinct styles of regional Mexican music and dance, each with its unique instrumentation and costumes. These styles include Traditional Mariachi, Son Jarocho of Veracruz, Tex-Mex Conjunto, and Pirecuas and Sones of Michoacán.

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MSSU Percussion Ensemble

7:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 10, 2005
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The MSSU Percussion Ensemble was founded in 2003 by the late Dr. Jeremy Kushner. The ensemble currently consists of nine members. The Percussion Ensemble is the major chamber ensemble for percussion majors and together with applied lessons and master classes forms the core of the percussionist’s education. Technical and musical skills are enhanced through the rehearsal and performance of a variety of literature including contemporary percussion repertoire, ethnic styles and transcriptions. Musical selections to be performed at this concert include: The Song of Queztecoatl, Toccata, Tijuana Samba, Two Mexican Dances, La Bamba, and Heat of the Day.

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