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Japan Themed Semester Speakers

 

Nancy Hope

 Nancy HopeNancy Hope lived in Japan for more than eight years, first as an officer in the United States Navy, and later as a designer and dyer of silk kimono at a Japanese studio in Kyoto. Her masters degrees in education, fine arts and art history are currently put to use at the University of Kansas where she is the Center for East Asian Studies Outreach Coordinator and a KU Continuing Education instructor in art history.

Japanese brushwork: understanding the visual record
9:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2001
Thomas E. Taylor Building Room 202
Admission: class enrollment only

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Dr. Van C. Gessel

 Dr. Van C. GesselDr. Gessel is a Professor of Japanese and Dean of the College of Humanities at Brigham Young University, where he has also been Chair of the Department of Asian and Near Eastern Languages. Dr. Gessel received his undergraduate degree in political science at the University of Utah, and his master's and Ph.D. degrees in Japanese language and literature at Columbia University.

Dr. Gessel came to Brigham Young in 1990. He has also been a faculty member at the University of California-Berkeley, Notre Dame, and Columbia. He has taught the third and fourth years of the Japanese language, Newspaper Japanese, Introduction to Japanese Literature (1600 to present), Modern Japanese Theatre, Edo Literature, Freshman Seminar in Japanese Civilization, Readings in Modern Japanese Literature, Survey of Japanese History, and graduate seminars in modern Japanese literature.

Professor Gessel is the author of The Sting of Life: Four Contemporary Japanese Novelists (Columbia University Press, 1989), editor of The Showa Anthology and two volumes on modern Japanese novelists for the Dictionary of Literary Biography series. He has published six translations of literary works by the Japanese Christian novelist Endo Shusaku.

Dr. Gessel has received the Student Award for Excellence in Teaching five times from the Department of Asian and Near Eastern Languages at Brigham Young. He lives in Orem, Utah.

Modern Japanese Literature's Ten Greatest Hits
11:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 14, 2001
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Preparing to Read a Japanese Novel
1:00 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, 2001
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. William R. Farrell

 Dr. William R. FarrellDr. William R. Farrell, author of the critically acclaimed Crisis and Opportunity in a Changing Japan, spoke on "The Japanese Economy: From Rising Sun to Setting Sun…How Could This Happen?" to a campus-wide convocation. Dr. Farrell is the former executive director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Japan (1990-95) and the current CEO of Dynamic Strategies Asia (DSA). A student of Japan for three decades, Dr. Farrell resided there for 12 years and is proficient in the language.

Gockel International Symposium: "Rising Sun, Looming Crisis:
Japan Facing Reform and Transition in the New Millennium"
September 18, 2001
Taylor Performing Arts Center

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Dr. William M. Tsutsui

 Dr. William M. TsutsuiDr. William M. Tsutsui, Associate Professor of History and Acting Director of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Kansas, spoke on "Sunrise, Sunset: Japan's Economy and the American Imagination since World War II." A specialist in Japanese business and economic history, Dr. Tsutsui is the author of Banking Policy in Japan (1988) and Manufacturing Ideology: Scientific Management in Twentieth-Century Japan (1998), which was awarded the John Whitney Hall Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. Dr. Tsutsui is the recipient of Marshall, Fulbright, Japan Foundation and ACLS fellowships, and currently serves on the boards of directors of Kansas State Historical Society and the Kansas Humanities Council.

Gockel International Symposium: "Rising Sun, Looming Crisis:
Japan Facing Reform and Transition in the New Millennium"
September 18, 2001
Taylor Performing Arts Center

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Dr. Mark Tilton

 Dr. Mark TiltonDr. Mark Tilton, Associate Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Asian Studies program at Purdue University, spoke on "The Politics of Pain: Prime Minister Koizumi's Attempt to Sell Economic Reform to the Japanese People." Mark Tilton's teaching and research interests include comparative political economy, East Asian politics, international trade, and theories of comparative politics. His publications include Restrained Trade: Cartels in Japan's Basic Materials Industries (Cornell University Press, 1996), Regulation and Regulatory Reform in Japan: Are Things Changing?, co-edited with Lonny Carlile (The Brookings Institution Press, 1998), and "Informal Market Governance in Japan's Basic Materials Industries" in International Organization. Dr. Tilton's past work has attempted to document how Japanese antitrust policy and industrial policy work together in practice. Currently, he is continuing that work in a comparative context, and is pondering the role ideas play in shaping economic policy. His ongoing research looks at Japanese, German and American antitrust policy, focusing on case studies of the steel and telecommunications industries.

Dr. Tilton did advanced Japanese language at the Stanford Inter-University Center for Japanese Studies in Tokyo (1976-7), and completed his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. (1990) in political science at U.C. Berkeley. He is the recipient of Fulbright, Japan Foundation, and Abe Fellowships, and his current work on Japanese telecommunications policy is funded by a grant from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission. He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Hamburg, Germany; the Science Center Berlin, Germany (WZB); the University of Tsukuba, Japan; and several times at the University of Tokyo. He has also presented lectures at Kobe University, Japan; Saitama University, Japan; the Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France; and several universities in Peru. He has spent five years residing in Japan, in trips over the past twenty-five years. In addition to Japanese, he speaks several European languages.

Gockel International Symposium: "Rising Sun, Looming Crisis:
Japan Facing Reform and Transition in the New Millennium"
September 18, 2001
Taylor Performing Arts Center

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Dr. Maggie Childs

 Dr. Maggie ChildsDr. Maggie Childs, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Culture at the University of Kansas, spoke on "Degrees of Cultural Accuracy in Memoirs of a Geisha." Her analysis of this work of contemporary fiction by American author Arthur Golden ranges from the truth about relationships between the sexes in Japan to Japanese literary genre in general.

Dr. Childs received her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania in 1983. She is an expert in all aspects of Japanese language and literature from the classical period through modern times. She was awarded the U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature for Rethinking Sorrow: Revelatory Tales from Late Medieval Japan (1990), an anthology of four translations with critical introduction.

Degrees of Cultural Accuracy in Memoirs of a Geisha
11:00 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, 2001
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Dale Slusser

 Dr. Dale SlusserDale Slusser, who has an M.A. in East Asian Languages and Cultures, is one of the few Americans certified as a Japanese tea master. He spoke on "The Japanese Tradition of Tea: a demonstration/lecture on the 400 year old ritual art of chanoyu."

Mr. Slusser has been practicing the Urasenke Tradition of Tea for over 17 years, including nearly 4 years of intensive study at the Urasenke Headquarters in Kyoto, Japan. From 1989-95 he was the official Urasenke representative for Southern California, where he offered regular classes in the Tradition of Tea as well as lectures and demonstrations. He received a Master of Arts from UCLA in 1993 with a thesis on the early history of tea in Japan. He currently continues his teaching of tea in Lawrence, Kansas.

Mr. Slusser is Assistant Director of Corporate and Foundation Development at the University of Kansas. He may be contacted at DSlusser@KUEndowment.org

The Japanese Tradition of Tea: a demonstration/lecture on the 400 year old ritual art of chanoyu
11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2001
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Elizabeth Oyler

 Dr. Dale SlusserDr. Elizabeth Oyler, Assistant Professor of Japanese Language and Literature at Washington University in St. Louis, spoke on "The Making of the Samurai: From Wild Warriors to the Way of the Warrior." This talk traces some central elements of the samurai image from legendary pre-history through medieval and modern interpretations of what it means to be a warrior in the Japanese context.

Dr. Oyler received her Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1999. She has been teaching pre-modern Japanese Literature and Language at Washington University in St. Louis since that time. Her area of specialization is medieval warriors and war tales.

The Making of the Samurai: From Wild Warriors to the Way of the Warrior
11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2001
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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Dr. Andrew T. Tsubaki

 Dr. Andrew T. TsubakiDr. Tsubaki was a Professor of Theatre & Film and East Asian Languages and Cultures at University of Kansas, where he taught since 1968. He was also the Director of the International Theatre Studies Center. In May of 2000 he retired from his positions at KU and became a Professor Emeritus. He was born and raised in Japan and completed his Ph.D. in Theatre at the Univ. of Illinois ('67). He specializes in the Japanese classical theatre forms: Noh, Kyogen and Kabuki. He also practices Ki-Aikido (holder of Fourth Degree black belt of this Japanese martial art) and is the Head Instructor of Kansas Ki Society in Lawrence, KS. He served as the President of Heart of America Japan-America Society in the Greater Kansas City area in '99. He is serving now as the Executive Director of the Japan Festival for Greater Kansas City. I He began serving for this Festival as the Chair of the Executive Committee since its inception in 1997.

At the University of Kansas and elsewhere he presented a number of authentic Japanese classical theatre pieces: Kabuki in '73 at KU, '74 (at Carleton College) and '76 (at Tel-Aviv Univ. in Israel), Noh and Kyogen in '85 and '92 (with a tour to the east coast), the fourth Kyogen production in '88 (with a tour to the east coast), the fifth, '92 (with a tour to Portland, OR, and to Japan) and the sixth, '98 (with a tour to north, east and south, USA) as well as several experimental productions utilizing characteristics of traditional theatre techniques. Notable among these are Rashomon by Fay and Michael Kanin for KU ('76 and '96), for Missouri Repertory Theatre in Kansas City ('78) and for the National School of Drama in New Delhi, India ('83); Shakespeare's King Lear ('85) and Euripides' Hippolytus ('90) for KU. This Hippolytus was re-staged for the First KU Summer Theatre Program in Greece in '90. Other plays directed were: The Island ('89) by Kiyomi Hotta and Tea ('95) by Velina Hasu Houston.

He also assisted Dr. Heinz-Uwe Haus, German director, as choreographer and movement coach in the production of Antigone by Sophocles ('87 and '88) in Greece and Cyprus; in Shakespeare's Hamlet ('89) in Kaiserslauten, Germany; in The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui by Bertolt Brecht ('91) at KU; in Ernst Toller's Man and the Masses ('93) and Caldron de la Barca's Das grosse Welt teater ('94) for the regional theatre of Trier, Germany; and in Sophocles' Oedipus Rex ('94) at Villanova Univ. In a similar capacity Dr. Tsubaki assisted Istavan Pinczes in the production of rewritten Greek tragedy of Oedipus and his children, Children of Fate ('94) for the state theatre of Debrecen, Hungary.

Aside from the above-mentioned countries, his activities took him to Holland, Monaco, Poland, Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, and Italy, as well as many locations in the U.S.A., to stage productions and/or to conduct lecture/demonstration/workshop sessions. His interest in and work with a masked folk dance theatre form of East India called Chau resulted in a '82 KU dance production under his direction. He led as the Director the KU Second Greek Theatre Program in Greece for summer of '97 for which he directed Euripides' Iphigenia in Tauris.

More recently, in November of '98 he presented a lecture with demonstration on Japanese traditional theatre forms for the Culture Center of the Japan Foundation in Sao Paulo and a similar lecture for the Kouhou Bunka Center of the Japanese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina in December, '98 and in October, '99. In May, '99, he presented a similar lecture for the Consulate General of Japan in Montreal, Canada. In addition he conducted a series of workshops for Univ. of Sao Paulo, a theatre group in Florianopolis, other in Porte Alegre, Brazil, in November '98.

He has published several articles, mainly in the area of Japanese theatre and translated a number of plays from Japanese to English, which were presented at the University of Kansas and elsewhere.

Living Tradition of Japan Today Through Theatre Forms and Martial Arts
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2001
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

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