MSSU France Semester

France Concerts and Theatrical Events

Concerts:
Theatre:

Theatre:

Poulenc Recital Dr, Cheryl Cifelli

8:00 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

The recital by Dr. Cheryl Cifelli, assistant professor of music at MSSU, consisted of chamber works by Francis Poulenc, including the Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, Sonata for Clarinet and Bassoon, Trio for Clarinet, Bassoon and Piano, and the Sonata for Two Clarinets. A reception followed.

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Southern Theatre Presents: The Lark

 Southern Theatre Presents: The Lark7:30 p.m., Tues.-Sat., Oct. 17-21, 2006
Bud Walton Theatre
Admission: free to students, faculty, staff;
$3 for adults;
$1 for senior citizens and high school students

This is the story of Joan of Arc, rooted in the Middle Ages yet rendered as vibrantly relevant as next week’s headlines. The Maid of Orléans spoke fearlessly in her own time and she still has much to say in ours. The New York Times described The Lark as “…a memorable picture of a moment that is immortal in history and exalting on the stage.” The play was written by Jean Anouilh and adapted by Lillian Hellman.

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Acting in the Classical Theatre

2:00 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006
Bud Walton Theatre Acting in the Classical Theatre
Admission: free

Playwright Timothy Mooney gave special insight into successful classical performance by working with Hamlet, Lear, Tartuffe, and Misanthrope. He explored the “most fundamental responsibilities of the actor,” and considered how those were fulfilled in the 17th century, audaciously drawing a straight line from Thespis to the Jerry Springer Show. This session was part lecture, part conversation, and part participatory interplay.

Timothy Mooney, an actor with 30 years’ experience, has been presenting this session for four years, presenting at the American College Theatre Festival, the Southeast Theatre Conference, the Rocky Mountain Theatre Association, the Texas Educational Theatre Association, and the Georgia Theatre Conference, as well as more than 60 high schools and colleges while presenting his one-man show, Molière Than Thou, well over 100 times.

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Molière Than Thou

7:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 4, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Molière finds himself left without a cast, when all of his fellow performers happen to consume “the same sort of shell fish” at one of the local public inns that the company tends to frequent. Rather than actually refund the precious box office income, Molière offers to perform a “greatest hits” of sorts, and leads the audience (which occasionally participates) through a hilarious succession of favorite speeches that trace his illustrious career. Timothy Mooney plays Molière, who performs routines from Tartuffe, Don Juan, The Doctor In Spite of Himself, The Precious Young Maidens, The Misanthrope, and The School For Wives among others. This gives Molière the perfect opportunity to explain his process of working on these plays, while managing to take a few deft stabs at some of his enemies: the doctors, the lawyers, and the sanctimonious hypocrites who would attack him throughout the years.

Playwright and co-director Timothy Mooney has adapted 15 Molière plays to the stage and performed all over the world. “Molière Than Thou” is drawn entirely on his new versions of these plays, and has received rave reviews throughout the U.S. and Canada while turning a new generation on to Molière. Mooney has been the artistic director of the Stage Two Theatre, taught acting at Northern Illinois University and the University of Nebraska, and wrote The Script Review, a newsletter for playwrights and producers.

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Concerts:

Pine Leaf Boys

 Pine Leaf Boys7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2006
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Pine Leaf Boys have been making a name for themselves for presenting their own inimitable brand of traditional Cajun and Creole music with youthful exuberance. In addition to the dance hall standards, they have made a point of bringing many of the more obscure songs of past masters into their repertoire and playing them with gusto. Skillful multi-instrumentalists, it’s not uncommon to see them switch and trade-off during their raucous shows. All five members, in their early 20s, Wilson Savoy, Cedric Watson, Jon Bertrand, Drew Simon, and Blake Miller live together in the same shotgun house near downtown Lafayette. Steeped in music since children and hailing from farms and villages in Cajun country the Pine Leaf Boys have been making a name for themselves as being not only a young group of musicians, but preserving the traditional Cajun sound, while allowing it to breathe and and stretch with those who play it. They present their music in multiple configurations such a twin fiddle, duo accordion/fiddle, bass, drum, and even stomping jurés.

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Blue Railroad Train

 Blue Railroad Train7:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 2, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Combine an American veteran bluegrass player and four top French musicians who all share a common passion for traditional bluegrass and country music and you get Blue Railroad Train. The repertoire is delightfully unpredictable and includes bluegrass and old-time classics as well as country, swing, and even rock’n’roll tunes. They also have several original songs and instrumentals, all firmly rooted in the tradition. Blue Railroad Train brings a French touch to their music with French folk tunes, chansons de marin (sea shanties), Cajun songs, and even occasional French lyrics for American country standards. They played festivals in Switzerland, Ireland, and the United Kingdom over the summer and can also be heard at concerts and clubs in the Paris area.

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Finding Pierre

 Finding Pierre9:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission free

How a history-averse fiddler from southern California became the Lewis & Clark Expedition’s main boatman and musician (albeit 200 years late), with side trips to the many other French members of the Corps of Northwest Discovery.

Fiddler Daniel Slosberg performs his one-man show in schools, libraries, museums, and historical sites throughout the country. Many living historians portray other members of the expedition, but Slosberg offers a unique depiction of the expedition’s main boatman and fiddler in a show that has been called “a delightful program of music and monologue.” It all started in 1997, when Ken Burns’ Lewis and Clark documentary aired on PBS. Upon learning that Lewis and Clark had a fiddle player along on their journey, Slosberg embarked upon his own “voyage of discovery,” learning everything he could about Pierre Cruzatte and the music, song and dance of the Lewis & Clark expedition. From this study, he put together his one-man living history program.

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Pierre Cruzatte: A Musical Journey Along the Lewis & Clark Trail

11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission free

Playing fiddle, jaw harp, bones, spoons, and other instruments of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, musician Daniel Slosberg took audiences on an unforgettable musical voyage with stops along the way for humorous and moving stories about the Lewis and Clark Expedition and Cruzatte’s critical contributions to it.

Fiddler Daniel Slosberg performs his one-man show in schools, libraries, museums, and historical sites throughout the country. Many living historians portray other members of the expedition, but Slosberg offers a unique depiction of the expedition’s main boatman and fiddler in a show that has been called “a delightful program of music and monologue.” It all started in 1997, when Ken Burns’ Lewis and Clark documentary aired on PBS. Upon learning that Lewis and Clark had a fiddle player along on their journey, Slosberg embarked upon his own “voyage of discovery,” learning everything he could about Pierre Cruzatte and the music, song and dance of the Lewis & Clark expedition. From this study, he put together his one-man living history program.

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Eric Vincent  Eric Vincent

7:00 p.m., Monday, Oct. 30, 2006
Webster Hall Auditorium
Admission: free

Eric Vincent began his career in Paris at the famous “Port du Salut” with Coluche. His name has appeared on marquees in more than 130 countries, where he is often considered one of the best contemporary singers in the tradition of the chanson française. He has filled the Brooklyn Auditorium in New York several times and has shared billing with American stars such as Dan Fogelberg. His songs, a blend of folk, jazz, rock, and ethnic rhythms, offer audiences direct contact with contemporary French poetry and songs.

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An Evening of La Musique Française

Dr. Kexi Liu,7:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 3, 2006
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Southern Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Kexi Liu, presented a symphonic concert. Internationally active cellist Joseph W. Rodgers, the featured soloist, joined the orchestra to perform the popular Cello Concerto No. 1 by Saint-Saëns. Other works on the program included Debussy's Prelude to "The Afternoon of a Faun," Bizet's Carmen Suite, and Berlioz's Roman Carnival Overture.

A reception followed the performance.

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