MSSU Egypt Semester

Egypt Themed Semester Speakers:

Bill Needle:

Bill Needle

Bill Needle is a professor emeritus of art history and Egyptology at Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, where he taught for 25 years. He was elected into membership of the Egypt Exploration Society (E.E.S.) of London in 1984; and in 1995 he was mentioned in the Who Was Who in Egyptology, published by the E.E.S. The American Research Center in Egypt honored Professor Needle and his wife, Ruth, with lifetime membership in 1991 for their efforts in Egyptology. He and Ruth have gained national and international recognition for their 35 years of work in producing authentic Egyptian hieroglyphic drawings.

 

 

Presentations:

Mysteries of the Great Pyramids: Some Unsolved, Some Solved But Now Forgotten
8:00 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Royal Connections: Six Famous Egyptian Kings and Queens
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Billionaire’s Curse: James Teackle Dennis, Early American Egyptologist
11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Joel Gordon:

 Dr. Joel Gordon:

Joel Gordon (Ph.D., University of Michigan) is a political and cultural historian of modern Egypt and the Middle East. He teaches and writes about political change, intersections of popular and public culture, historical memory and nostalgia, and religious and secular crosscurrents, with emphases on cinema, music and mass media. He is the author of three books – Nasser’s Blessed Movement (1992), Revolutionary Melodrama (2002), and Nasser: Hero of the Arab Nation (2006) – and the chapter on Egypt since 1919 in the New Cambridge History of Islam. Dr. Gordon joined the University of Arkansas Department of History in 1999 and has directed the King Fahd Center for Middle East & Islamic Studies since 2009. He sits on the Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies Program Committee (CLCS) and is the host of Nadi Cinema, the Middle East Film Club at the University of Arkansas.

 

Presentations:

Revolution and Military Rule in Egypt: Legacies and Prospects
10:00 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Hollywood on the Nile: Viewing Arab/Egyptian Cinema
12:00 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Jerry Rose:

 Jerry Rose:

Jerry Rose is a professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas and has worked in the Middle East since 1998. He co-directed a collaborative bioarchaeology field school with Yarmouk University in Jordan from 1995 to 2007. He was the bioarchaeologist for the joint Dutch-Russian excavations at Tell Ibrahim Awad, an Old to Middle Kingdom site in the Egyptian delta. He was also co-director of a bioarchaeological project at the predynastic site of Hierakonpolis being excavated by an American team. He is now the director of a bioarchaeological field school to the New Kingdom site of Amarna in collaboration with the British archaeology team.

 

 

Presentations:

The People of Predynastic Hierakonpolis: Life and Death Before Unification
9:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 16, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The People of Amarna Speak: Akhenaten’s Failed Experiment with Monotheism and a New Capital City
11:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 16, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. John Duke Anthony:

 Dr. John Duke Anthony:

Dr. John Duke Anthony is the founding president and Chief Executive Officer of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations. He currently serves on the United States Department of State Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy and its subcommittees on Sanctions and Trade and Investment. For the past 37 years, he has been a consultant and regular lecturer on the Arabian Peninsula and the Gulf for the Departments of Defense and State. A life member of the Council on Foreign Relations since 1986, Dr. Anthony has been a frequent participant in its study groups on issues relating to the Arabian Peninsula and Gulf regions and the broader Arab and Islamic world. Dr. Anthony is the author of three books, the editor of a fourth, and has published more than 175 articles, essays, and monographs dealing with America’s interests and involvement in the Arab countries, the Middle East, and the Islamic world.

 

Presentations:

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium
The Changing Nature of America’s Interests in Egypt: Implications for U.S. Policies
9:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium
Egypt in Regional and World Affairs: Dynamics of Convergence and Divergence

Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Mark Long:

 Dr. Mark Long:

Dr. Mark Long, director of Middle East Studies and associate professor in the Honors College at Baylor University, specializes in contemporary Islamic fundamentalism and the Arab-Israeli conflict. A former Air Force intelligence analyst, Dr. Long has traveled repeatedly throughout the Middle East and has lectured extensively on Middle East politics and religion, as well as on the Persian Gulf War. He is the author of Saddam’s War of Words: Politics, Religion, and the Iraqi Invasion of Kuwait (University of Texas Press, 2004), nominated for the British Society of Middle East Studies prize. Additionally, he has published articles on Islam, jihad, and international terrorism. He has been a frequent guest on radio and television programs to discuss war in the Middle East. His current research focuses on the ideology of al-Qaida and the formation of a national security strategy to confront it. He has done collaborative work with the Institute for National Security Studies, which focuses on al-Qaida and weapons of mass destruction.

Presentations:

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium
If We Turn Our Backs
7:00 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Harry and Berniece Gockel International Symposium
The U.S. and al-Qaida: A Clash of Meta-Narratives
10:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 23, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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LTC Mohamed Nagy Ibrahim:

 LTC Mohamed Nagy Ibrahim:

LTC Mohamed Nagy Ibrahim received a bachelor’s of military science degree from the Egyptian Military Academy in 1995. He received a master’s in military science in 2008. He is a graduate of the Egyptian Command and General Staff College course and also received a diploma in business administration from the Al-Sadat Academy in 1999. LTC Ibrahim has served in the Special Forces, in armor units, as a commander of a prosecution unit, and as a senior staff officer in the Egyptian Army. He has been assigned to units on the Egyptian borders with Israel, Libya, and the Sudan as well as in the Central Command. LTC Ibrahim is currently a student at the United States Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.

 

Presentations:

Egypt: 7,000 Years of Civilization
11:00 a.m. Friday, Sept. 30, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

January 25, 2011: A New Beginning in Egypt
12:00 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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John Calvert:

 John Calvert:

John Calvert is an associate professor of history at Creighton University in Omaha. He received a Ph.D. from McGill University’s Institute of Islamic Studies in 1994. His research focuses on Islamist discourses, especially in Egypt. He is author of Sayyid Qutb and the Origins of Radical Islamism (Hurst & Co./Columbia University Press, 2010); Islamism: A Documentary and Reference Guide (Greenwood Press, 2007); and co-editor and co-translator of Sayyid Qutb’s A Child from the Village (Syracuse University Press, 2005). His articles have appeared in Orbis, Historical Reflections, Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations, Muslim World and the Journal of Religion and Society. He has appeared in documentaries produced by BBC and National Public Radio and has been interviewed by major newspapers around the world.

 

Presentations:

Muhammad Ali: Founder of Modern Egypt
9:00 a.m. Monday, Oct. 3, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Muslim Brotherhood: Reformers or Radicals?
11:00 a.m. Monday, Oct. 3, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Tahrir!: Understanding the Egyptian Revolution of 2011
1:00 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Jim Lile:

 Dr. Jim Lile:

Dr. Jim Lile is an associate professor of theatre and head of the Theatre Department and Art Department at Missouri Southern State University. He is co-editor of The Texas Theatre Journal to which he has contributed editorials and various other pieces. Dr. Lile teaches Theatre Appreciation and Theatre History. His primary research interest lies in 19th century American theatre and drama.

Presentations:

Cleopatra in the Theatre
9:00 a.m. Monday, October 10, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Joe Hobbs:

 Dr. Joe Hobbs:

Joe Hobbs is a professor and the department chair in the University of Missouri’s Department of Geography. He first visited Egypt in 1971 and has been dedicated to understanding this extraordinary country ever since. His undergraduate thesis (in anthropology at the University of California-Santa Cruz) and his master’s thesis (in geography at the University of Texas-Austin) examined the changing environments of ancient Egypt as depicted in tombs and papyri. His doctoral dissertation fieldwork (also at Austin) focused on the Bedouin perceptions and uses of the environment in Egypt’s Eastern Desert. Dr. Hobbs is in the middle of a three-year grant focusing on pastoral nomads’ uses of an acacia trees in the eastern Sahara. He has also worked extensively in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula, especially in the area around the Monastery of St. Katherine and Jebel Musa (“Mount Sinai”). He helped the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency to establish a national park in south Sinai, with special attention to how local Bedouin could contribute to and benefit from the park. His books include Bedouin Life in the Egyptian Wilderness, Mount Sinai, and the textbooks World Regional Geography and Fundamentals of World Regional Geography.

Presentations:

The Bedouin of Egypt
9:30 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Natural Marvels of Egypt’s Deserts
11:00 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Gamal Gomaa:

 Gamal Gomaa:

Born in Giza, Egypt, Gamal Gomaa began studying percussion at age eight. Five years later he was playing tabla for “El Ferka el Gamaeya” from the University of Cairo under Maestro Mustafa Abdel Hamid. In 1971, at age 16, Gamal was invited to record and perform with European singing star Demis Roussos. Over the next decade Gamal toured worldwide, working with and composing tabla solos for several Egyptian dance stars. In 1976, Gamal graduated from the Music Academy of Cairo. He went on to teach music there until 1979. In 1984, Gamal was invited to work in New York City where he played for the top dancers and singers of the time. In addition to performing in nightclubs, Gamal became the drummer for the legendary Ibrahim Farah. Gamal began his professional singing career in New York City, which led him to Los Angeles in 1993. He has won several awards for his work, including the 2000 Arab American Association award for outstanding performance in Middle Eastern Music. As a percussionist, Gamal performed with Chebi Sabah in 2006 and at the Hollywood Bowl in 2007. He currently resides in Los Angeles, where he sings professionally and teaches tabla, doof, sagat, riq, dahola, and rhythm for dancers.

Presentations:

The Heartbeat of Egypt
12:00-2:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011
Phinney Recital Hall
Admission: free

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Rosemary Mahoney:

 Rosemary Mahoney:

Rosemary Mahoney is the author of five books of non-fiction: The Early Arrival of Dreams: A Year in China (1990), which was a New York Times Notable Book; Whoredom in Kimmage (1993); The World of Irish Women, which was a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist and a New York Times Notable book; A Likely Story: One Summer with Lillian Hellman (1998); and The Singular Pilgrim: Travels on Sacred Ground, which was selected as a best book of the year by both The San Francisco Chronicle and The Christian Science Monitor.

Mahoney’s most recent book, Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman’s Skiff, was one of Entertainment Weekly’s top 10 non-fiction books of 2007, one of the National Book Critics’ Circle’s 32 Best Recommended Books of 2007, one of 100 Notable Books of the year in the New York Times, and was ranked No. 2 on Amazon.com’s list of the 10 best travel books of 2007. It was also a best book of the year in Publisher’s Weekly and The Christian Science Monitor. Jan Morris selected Down the Nile for Conde Nast Traveller’s list of the best travel books of all time. At present Mahoney is at work on a book about blindness; the book is based on her experience teaching at the Braille Without Borders International Institute for blind social entrepreneurs in Kerala, India.

Mahoney was awarded the Charles E. Horman Prize for Fiction Writing as an undergraduate at Harvard College. She has received a Henfield-Transatlantic Review Award, a Whiting Writer’s Award, a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and a 2011 Guggenheim Fellowship. She has written for numerous publications, including The New York Times, The Washington Post Book World, The London Observer, The New York Times Book Review, The Los Angeles Times Book Review, National Geographic Traveler, O Magazine and The New York Times Magazine. She lives in Rhode Island and the Republic of Cyprus.

Presentations and Events:

Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman’s Skiff
9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Book Signings and Q&A with Rosemary Mahoney
11:00-11:30 a.m. and 1:00-2:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011
8:30-9:45 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011
Third floor of Spiva Library (by the fireplace)
Admission: free

From Napoleon to Now: The Tradition of Foreign Travelers in Egypt
7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Gender Attitudes and Religious Mores in Egyptian Society
10:00 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2011
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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