MSSU China Semester

China Concerts and Theatrical Events

Theatre:
Concerts:

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Theatre:

Southern Theatre presents: Snow in Midsummer  Southern Theatre presents: Snow in Midsummer

7:30 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday, Sept. 11-15, 2007
Bud Walton Theatre
Admission: free to students, faculty, staff; $3 for adults; $1 for senior citizens and high school students

By Kuan Han-ch’ing, translated by Liu Jung-en
Directed by Dr. James Lile

Southern Theatre offers a classic play from the Yuan Dynasty in which a virtuous young woman, executed for a murder she did not commit, sends her spirit back to earth to see that justice is finally done. This play has been popular with Chinese audiences since the 13th century.

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Kung Fu Theatre: Tales from the Beijing Opera  Kung Fu Theatre: Tales from the Beijing Opera

7:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2007
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

A series of comic and dramatic scenes from China’s most popular stories. Told in English and Chinese, this “kung fu” theatre is a combination of music, dialogue, dance, mime, and acrobatics. These scenes capture the magic and beauty of China’s most renowned performing arts tradition.

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Concerts:

Diabolo Dance Theatre of Taiwan  Diabolo Dance Theatre of Taiwan

7:00 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2007
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Diabolo Dance Theatre of Taiwan has merged traditional diabolo with contemporary dance and gymnastics, becoming the first artistic performing group to combine these creative elements with theatrical ideas. These young performers, ranging in age from 8 to 24, have mastered the skills of playing diabolo with musical rhythm, ballet, gymnastics, jazz, and martial arts. Diabolos have been one of the most popular toys for children in China for over 4,000 years. Spinning, tossing, swinging, looping, and bouncing are the five basics in playing the diabolo. For better control of the rolling diabolo, a player needs to learn how to breathe along with the movement and how to concentrate on the flying diabolo.

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Wu Man and Friends

7:00 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 1, 2007  Wu Man and Friends
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

In a meeting of East and West, Chinese pipa virtuoso Wu Man joins forces with Appalachian folk guitarist Lee Knight and Ugandan musician James Makubuya to create a fascinating blend of two musical cultures and to revisit the music from her album, “Wu Man and Friends.” Wu Man is an internationally renowned pipa virtuoso, cited by the Los Angeles Times as “the artist most responsible for bringing the pipa to the Western World.” Born in Hangzhou, China, Wu Man studied at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing where she became the first recipient of a master’s degree in pipa. Wu Man was selected by Yo-Yo Ma as the winner of the City of Toronto Glenn Gould Protégé Prize in music and communication. She is also the first artist from China to have performed at the White House with the noted cellist with whom she now performs as part of the Silk Road Project. Her touring has taken her to the major music halls of the world including Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center.

Lee Knight Lee Knight

Raised in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York, Lee Knight became interested in folk music while in high school. During college, he became familiar with the music and stories of the Southern Appalachian Mountains, as well as of the Adirondacks. He wanted to learn the music and stories from traditional sources — people who had them as part of their culture and community for generations. He also collected songs and stories from other parts of the world, including England, Scotland, Central Asia, Columbia and the Amazon region of Peru.

Lee Knight currently works as a folk singer, story teller and outdoor leader, performing at concerts, workshops, Elderhostels, festivals, camps and schools. He leads hikes, canoe trips and guides whitewater rafts. He plays various instruments, including the five-string banjo, various guitars, the Appalachian dulcimer, the mouth bow, the Cherokee flute and the Cherokee rattle, as well as the Native American drum.

Dr. James Makubuya

Dr. James MakubuyaDr. James Makubuya is an associate professor of music at Wabash College in Indiana. With the endongo (8-string bowl lyre) as his main instrument, he is a proficient performer of several instruments, including the akogo (thumb piano), adungu (9-string bow harp), endingidi (1-string tube fiddle), amadinda (12-slab log xylophone), and engoma (drums). He is also an accomplished dancer and choreographer, having studied with several master musicians and dancers from various East African musical traditions.

Dr. Makubuya was born and brought up in the culture of the Baganda, in the East African nation of Uganda. He graduated with a B.A. in Music & English Literature from Makerere University in Uganda, a Master of Music degree in Western Music from Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and a Ph.D., in Ethnomusicology from UCLA.

His most recent solo performances include Carnegie Hall, the London Trinity College of Music, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music. He jointly produced a CD, ]Wu Man and Friends, in 2005 with Wu Man, Lee Knight, and Julian Kytasy.

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Sound of China
 Langning Liu  Dr. Kexi Liu

7:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 9, 2007
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Southern Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Kexi Liu, will present an all-Chinese concert. The program includes the world premiere of a commissioned work by internationally known composer Zhou Long. On the program is also the popular Chinese piano concerto, The Yellow River Piano Concerto, performed by prize-winning pianist Langning Liu. In addition, the orchestra will perform Chinese music of different styles, traditional and modern.

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Songs and Dances of China The Henan Song and Dance Troupe, from Zhengzhou

7:30 p.m., Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2007
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

The Henan Song and Dance Troupe, from Zhengzhou, capital of the Henan Province in China, includes a symphony orchestra, an orchestra of Chinese instruments, an opera company, a dance company, and other performing art groups. Its performers have won national competitions in music and dance. Tonight’s program, presented by 15 selected performers of the troupe, includes colorful dances, folk songs, and Chinese instrumental music performed on the erhu, suona, zheng, and sheng.

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East Meets West: Amelia Piano Trio The Amelia Piano Trio

7:00 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 6, 2007
College Heights Christian Church
4311 E. Newman Road
Admission: free

The Amelia Piano Trio (Anthea Kreston, violin; Jason Duckles, cello; and Rieko Aizawa, piano; joined by Wang Guowei, erhu) is among the most exciting young chamber ensembles to appear in the last decade. Making their mark by commissioning new works as well as performing vivid interpretations of traditional chamber fare, they have become one of the world’s most sought-after ensembles. Their “East Meets West” concert consists of Chinese traditional music arranged for the erhu, pipa, and piano trio:

Jin Fuzai Spring in the Air for pipa and erhu
Lu Pei

Girls, Butterflies and Tam-Tam and Drums for cello and pipa
Bach


Andante from the Double Violin Concerto arranged for erhu, pipa and piano trio
Lu Pei

Songs of Consonance for erhu, pipa and piano trio
Traditional Rainbow Dance, for Erhu and Pipa
Ravel Piano Trio in a minor

The concert is sponsored by Pro Musica. There is no admission charge, but donations are appreciated. Call 417-625-1822 for additional information.

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