MSSU Canada Semester

Canada Concerts and Theatrical Events

Theatre:
Concerts:

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Theatre:

 Southern Theatre presents: Emily Carr
Southern Theatre presents: Emily Carr

7:30 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday, Sept. 15-19, 2009
Bud Walton Theatre
Admission: free to students, faculty, staff;
$3 for adults; $1 for senior citizens and high school students

By Herman Voaden
Directed by Dr. James Lile

For the Canada Semester, Southern Theatre presents a United States premiere. Herman Voaden was a playwright who dedicated his career to the quest for a dramatic voice that was distinctly Canadian. He was also deeply passionate about the power of theatre. He wrote, “In a world fraught with dissatisfaction and haunted with a sense of spiritual inadequacy the theatre remains a repository for great hope, vision and belief.” In famed Canadian author and painter Emily Carr, Voaden found a subject as passionate about art as he was. His play allows us to share her journey through the trials and triumphs, the sacrifices and successes, of a life lived in the service of art.

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Concerts:

 Great Big Sea
Great Big Sea

7:00 p.m., Monday, Oct. 5, 2009
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Great Big Sea, a folk-rock band from Newfoundland, has become one of Canada’s most popular exports. The group draws upon their homeland’s strong Irish and Scottish ancestry and centuries-old seafaring heritage for a mix of sea shanties, folk pop, rowdy Celtic pub songs, and Cajun-style sounds. “Our music is of Newfoundland,” explains multi-instrumentalist Sean McCann. “It would be impossible to do what we do if we were from anywhere else. Our songs come from the sea and the cliffs and the rocks and all the other natural beauties our country provides. Without her we simply couldn’t exist.” Great Big Sea’s fans have been responding since their self-titled debut in 1993; all of their albums have gone gold, and most are multi-platinum.

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 Clinking Maple Leaves: An All-Canadian Concert
Clinking Maple Leaves: An All-Canadian Concert

by Southern Symphony Orchestra
7:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 6, 2009
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Though a “young” country, Canada has produced a surprising rich repertoire in music, ranging from traditional folk songs to modern sounds. Canadian music represents its diversified people, culture, and landscape. Southern Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Kexi Liu, will present an all-Canadian concert.

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Celebrating Canada and Christmas

7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2009
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

 Celebrating Canada and ChristmasThe Missouri Southern State University Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble will present its winter concert, “Celebrating Canada and Christmas,” to end the Canada Semester at MSSU.

The concert will begin with the Wind Ensemble, MSSU’s select concert band, performing Variants on a Mediaeval Tune by Norman Dello Joio. The piece, written on commission for the Duke University Band, is based upon the melody “In dulci jubilo” which has been used by many composers but known by most people as the melody for “Good Christian Men Rejoice.”

The ensemble will continue with pieces by three current Canadian composers. Bali is a composition by Michael Colgrass, a Pulitzer Prize and Emmy Award-winning composer who currently lives in Toronto. Kanata Spring is composed by a young Canadian composer (b. 1981) named David Eastmond. Kanata is an Iroqoian word meaning village or settlement. It is also a city that was established in 1978 in the province of Ontario. Today Kanata has become a suburb of Ottawa known for its high-tech industry. Kanata Spring evokes images of prosperity, excitement and celebration. A fragment of a familiar Canadian patriotic theme forms the basis of the hymn tune which unifies the piece.

The Wind Ensemble will conclude the first half of the concert with C’est Noel (It is Christmas), by composer Andre Jutras from Asbestos, Quebec. Since April 2000, he has held the position of music officer with the Canada Council for the Arts. The piece is described by the composer as a French Canadian Yuletide celebration incorporating three traditional Christmas songs that are well known throughout Canada and the United States.

The Symphonic Concert band will begin the second half with Alfred Reed’s A Christmas Intrada. The piece, commissioned by the Middle Tennessee State University Band, represents an attempt to portray in musical terms alone five contrasting moods associated with the festivities of the Christmas season. O Magnum Mysterium, composed by Morten Lauridsen (b. 1943), has become one of the world’s most performed and recorded choral compositions since its 1994 premiere by the Los Angeles Master Chorale. H. Robert Reynolds has arranged the symphonic wind version of this popular work with the approval and appreciation of the composer. The band will continue with a Shelley Hanson composition, Patapan. “Get your little drum...bring your flute...” is the usual English translation of the French lyrics which Bernard de la Monnoye wrote in approximately 1700 for his great carol Patapan. In this arrangement, the “little drum” plays in the style of the Irish bodhran drum, and Monnoye’s exciting tune is combined with the joyful carol from 16th century London, God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen. As Patapan’s lyric’s say, “When you play your fife and drum, how can anyone be glum?” The concert will conclude with the traditional winter favorite by Leroy Anderson, Sleigh Ride.

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