MSSU Canada Semester

Canada Themed Semester Speakers

Dr. David M. Lee:

Dr. David M. Lee:Dr. David M. Lee has a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin and is professor emeritus from Missouri State University, where he taught French for 25 years. He led frequent study tours to Québec, and for more than 10 years accompanied MSU students to the Université Laval for the summer French program.

Presentations:

Québec, the Cradle of Canada
10:00 a.m., Friday, Aug. 28, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Robert Beckett:

 Dr. Robert Beckett:Robert Beckett, emeritus professor of English at Missouri State University, taught there from 1963 until 1998. From 1985 until his retirement, he taught at least one course in Canadian literature each year, because one of the conditions of help from the Canadian government for his Fall 1984 sabbatical was that he and his home university would agree to offer such a course each of year after his return. Dr. Beckett taught and came to admire Canadian literature, and he served one year as president of the Midwest Association for Canadian Studies. During his sabbatical he interviewed many Canadian writers and teachers of Canadian literature and formed lasting friendships.

Presentations:

Two Canadian Writers of Multi-volume Fiction:
Robertson Davies and Margaret Laurence
7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Craig T. Palmer:

 Dr. Craig T. Palmer:Craig T. Palmer is an associate professor of cultural anthropology and director of graduate studies in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from Arizona State University in 1988. His research focuses on kinship, religion, ritual, cooperation, migration, sports and the ecological adaptations of fishing communities to their environment. His experience working in the commercial lobster fishery of Maine for five years during the 1980s led to his anthropological fieldwork in fishing communities on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland, Canada. This research started in 1990 and initially focused on the social consequences of the collapse of the cod stocks that had been the primary economic resource in the area for centuries. More recently his research has followed the residents of Newfoundland as the collapse of the fishery has caused them to have to migrate to western Canada in order to find jobs in the oil industry of northern Alberta. His current research focuses on how these individuals maintain many of their Newfoundland traditions and use these to create networks of social relationships with other Newfoundlanders to help meet the many challenges faced in the new environment of western Canada.

Presentations:

The Cultural Anthropology of Canada:
As Viewed Through the Lens of Ice Hockey
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Past and Present Behavior of Mummers:
What the Reinvention of a Traditional Ritual in Newfoundland Tells Us
about Worldwide Changes in Human Social Relationships
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Why are There So Many Newfoundland Flags in Alberta?
Newfoundland Identity and Supportive Social Networks
9:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 4, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

In Cod They Trusted: Ecological Knowledge, Social Context and the
Overexploitation of Marine Resources in Eastern Canada
11:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 4, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. James Lile:

 Dr. James Lile:Dr. James Lile is an associate professor of theatre and head of the Theatre Department at Missouri Southern State University. He is co-editor of The Texas Theatre Journal to which he has contributed editorials and various other pieces. Dr. Lile teaches Theatre Appreciation and Theatre History. His primary research interest lies in 19th century American theatre and drama. Southern Theatre’s Emily Carr will be the sixth play that Dr. Lile has directed specifically for the themed semester program.

Presentations:

Something Bigger Than Fact: The Art and Life of Emily Carr
12:00 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Anton Wagner:

 Dr. Anton Wagner:Dr. Anton Wagner is a Canadian cultural historian and former adjunct professor in the York University Faculty of Fine Arts in Toronto. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto with the thesis Herman Voaden’s Symphonic Expressionism. Dr. Wagner has edited play anthologies, bibliographies and collections of essays such as Contemporary Canadian Theatre: New World Visions and Establishing Our Boundaries: English-Canadian Theatre Criticism. For this presentation he draws on his play anthology, A Vision of Canada: Herman Voaden’s Dramatic Works.

Presentations:

Herman Voaden, Canadian Playwright
10:00 a.m., Monday, Sept. 14, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Trends in Contemporary Canadian Theatre and Drama
1:00 p.m., Monday, Sept. 14, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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A.F. "Al" O'Donnell:

 A.F. "Al" O'Donnell:Inspector A.F. “Al” O’Donnell is the officer in charge of operations at the Nanaimo, British Columbia Detachment of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. He is a 35-year veteran of the RCMP and has diverse experience in operations, community policing, Aboriginal policing, traffic, strategic planning, and contract policing. His RCMP service includes 15 postings throughout Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, British Columbia, and Yukon Territory), an 11-year stint north of the 60th parallel, and two years above the Arctic Circle.

Presentations:

Of Myth and Mounties: A History of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
9:00 a.m., Monday, Sept. 21, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Modern Model of the RCMP
11:00 a.m., Monday, Sept. 21, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

A Tradition of Service: The RCMP and Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples
1:00 p.m., Monday, Sept. 21, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Elizabeth Paddock:

 Dr. Elizabeth Paddock:Dr. Elizabeth Paddock graduated from Kansas State University with a bachelor of arts degree in Modern Languages (French) and the University of Kansas with a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in political science, notably comparative politics and American politics. Her dissertation addressed political culture and ethnolinguistic challenges in Canada, Belgium, France, and the United States. Dr. Paddock lives in Springfield, Mo., where she has taught political science for more than 20 years at Drury University. She has lived in France, and travels extensively in Canada and the United States. She currently is chair of the Department of History, Political Science, and Geography, and is working on a manuscript that examines political culture and the evolution and challenges of women’s political engagement in Canada and the United States.

Presentations:

Canadian Mosaic
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

“I’m an Albertan First!” Tales of Provincial-Federal Relations
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Jean Stringam:

Jean Stringam:Dr. Jean Stringam is an associate professor of English at Missouri State University, where she specializes in young adult and children’s literature. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, where she wrote on 19th century short adventure fiction for adolescents written by Canadians but published in periodicals from England and the United States. Her publications and conference papers in this area investigate the materials using various critical perspectives. Dr. Stringam is particularly energized by the international experience; she has recently taught as an exchange professor for two years at Qingdao University in China and for the Missouri London Program.

 

Presentations:

 Turn-of-the-Century Canadian Literaturefor the Young and Dutiful: Each Time Has to be the First Time When Re-experiencing Anne of Green Gables
10:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 12, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Turn-of-the-Century Canadian Literature for the Young and Adventurous: Fierce Animals, Red Indians, & Terrible Storms: Courage, Pluck, & Derring-do and None of It Seen from an Arm-Chair
12:00 p.m., Monday, Oct. 12, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. William Kumbier:

 Dr. William Kumbier:Dr. William Kumbier is a professor of English at Missouri Southern State University, where he has taught primarily writing and world literature since 1989. He has researched and written extensively on interactions between music and literature, publishing essays in Studies in Romanticism, Criticism, Comparative Literature and elsewhere. He is currently working on a manuscript on subjectivity and dispossession in music, literature and film, including a chapter on Thomas Bernhard's The Loser, an obsessional novel in which a fictionalized Glenn Gould plays a decisive role.

Presentations:

Gouldberg Variations: Glenn Gould’s Polyphonic Art and Life
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Oct. 8, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Georges Rioux:

 Georges Rioux:Georges Rioux was appointed Consul General of Canada and arrived in Chicago to assume his duties on Aug. 14, 2006. He is actively engaged in the three-state area for which he is responsible - Illinois, Missouri, and Wisconsin.

Presentations:

Gockel International Symposium:
Canada and the U.S.: Partners in Security and Prosperity
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Gockel International Symposium:
The Obama Effect: Canada-U.S. Relations
7:45 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Gockel International Symposium:
Canada in Afghanistan: Development, Defence, and Diplomacy
11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Mark Kasoff:

Mark Kasoff is professor emeritus of Canadian studies and economics at Bowling Green State University, where he founded BGSU’s Canadian Studies Program in 1991. Along with Patrick James, Dr. Kasoff is co-editor of Canadian Studies in the New Millennium (University of Toronto Press, 2008), the most widely used Canadian Studies textbook. Dr. Kasoff, who was editor of The American Review of Canadian Studies from 2002-06, has published numerous articles and book chapters on Canadian international trade and direct investment.

Presentations: 

Gockel International Symposium:
O Canada-Au Canada: Understanding and Appreciating our Northern Neighbor
10:15 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Gockel International Symposium:
Like a Mouse Sleeping with an Elephant: Canada-U.S. Relations
7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Gockel International Symposium:
NAFTA and the North American Economy
9:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Jay T. Johnson:

 Dr. Jay T. Johnson:Dr. Jay T. Johnson is an assistant professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Kansas. Originally from Kansas City, Kan., and of Munsee Delaware and Western Cherokee descent, Dr. Johnson teaches cultural geography and Indigenous Nations studies courses. His current research interests concern the broad area of Indigenous peoples’ cultural survival with specific regard to the areas of resource management, political activism at the national and international levels, and the philosophies and politics of place which underpin the drive for cultural survival. Much of his work is comparative in nature but focuses predominately on New Zealand and North America.

Presentations:

Nunavut: An Inuit Approach to Wildlife Management
10:00 a.m., Monday, Nov. 9, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

First Nations and Treaty-Partnership in Canada
12:00 p.m., Monday, Nov. 9, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Marc T. Boucher:

 Marc T. Boucher:Marc T. Boucher was named to head the Québec Government office in Chicago in June 2007. For the two previous years, he had taught at the University of Québec’s Graduate School of Public Administration (ÉNAP). Mr. Boucher previously served as director of the Québec Government Office in Los Angeles. Before that time, he held the position of director general of public affairs at the Québec Ministry of International Relations and served for one year as director general of policy and planning. He has also served as counsellor for U.S. National Affairs in Washington and New York, and was director of the Québec Government Office in Atlanta from 1994 to 1996.

Presentations:

From Champlain to the Cirque du Soleil - 400 years of French in North America
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 12, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Québec in North America: Nation Building in the North
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 12, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Kathryn Bridge:

 Kathryn Bridge:Kathryn Bridge, a professional archivist at the British Columbia Archives in Victoria, British Columbia, wrote The Lost Klee Wyck, the introduction to the 2003 reissuing of Emily Carr’s 1941 collection of short stories and word sketches. Her work with Klee Wyck also involved making detailed comparisons of the first edition with the American edition, the English edition, the educational editions, the current editions, and examining the manuscripts to locate the excised selections. She also researched Carr’s correspondence and journals to see what Carr herself had to say about writing her book and having it published and her position on copyright and on moral rights.

Ms. Bridge’s next project, almost on the heels of Klee Wyck, was to convince the Royal BC Museum Corp. that the as-yet-unpublished Carr manuscripts in the collection might be worthy of posthumous publication. The RBCM published, in 2004, Wildflowers, using Carr’s unfinished manuscript, illustrated with botanical wildflower illustrations by Emily Woods, one of Carr’s formative teachers. Bridges wrote the foreword and afterword for this book.

Ms. Bridge is nearing completion of a Ph.D. in Canadian history at the University of Victoria. She will be curating a collaborative exhibition of works by a contemporary artist inspired by Carr alongside original Carr art works pared with historic photographs.

Presentations:

Emily Carr’s Klee Wyck
9:00 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

“A Little Old Lady on the Edge of Nowhere”: Canada’s National Treasure, Emily Carr
6:30 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2009
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Artist, Author, Eccentric, Genius: Will Emily Carr please identify herself!
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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 Dr. Mark Kasoff:

 
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