MSSU Brazil Semester

Brazil Themed Semester Speakers:

James Bogan:

 James Bogan

James Bogan is a professor of art history, a poet, and a filmmaker who has taught at the Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla since 1969. His scholarly publications include Sparks of Fire (1982), an experimental anthology on William Blake, and Burden of Dreams (1984), a casebook on Les Blank’s film. Ozark Meandering, a book of maximal poems and essays was published in 1999. In 1986 he lectured at the Federal University of Para in Brazil as a Fulbright Fellow, where he also began his career as a documentary filmmaker with T-Shirt Cantata followed by The Hammock Variations (1996) and The Adventures of the Amazon Queen (2007). He is a Curators’ Teaching Professor and has won the President’s Award for Outstanding Teaching in the University of Missouri System. He continues his research in he Ozarks and in the Amazon on foot and in kayak.

Presentations:

Amazing Amazonians and Beautiful Boats
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday, August 30 - September 24, 2010
MSSU Spiva Art Gallery
Admission: free

The Adventures of the Amazon Queen and the Adventures of Making the Amazon Queen
7:00 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 23, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

How to Turn a Poem into a Film: T-Shirt Cantana
1:00 p.m., Monday, Nov. 1, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Hammock Variations
9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

On the Impossibility of Translating Poetry and Why We Do It Anyway
11:00 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 2, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Robert Walker:

 Dr. Robert Walker:

Robert Walker is an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He received his Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico in 2004. His research attempts to understand behavioral and life-history variation among humans from a socioecological and evolutionary perspective. His research and teaching goals focus on situating modern human variation in development, behavior and life-history against a backdrop of variation in other primates and other mammals. He is especially interested in using comparative analyses to study the evolution of long, slow-growing (yet large-brained) juvenile periods in humans as this is arguably the most derived human trait, driven by our early age at weaning and delayed growth spurt. Professor Walker has conducted research in Brazil, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Suriname with hunter-gatherers and subsistence horticulturalists.

Presentations:

Peoples and Cultures of the Amazon
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Anthropology of the Amazon: Partible Paternity and Promiscuous Mating
11:00 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 2, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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João Almino:

 João Almino:

João Almino is a Brazilian writer and diplomat. Born in 1950, he was Consul General of Brazil in San Francisco, Lisbon, and Miami; Deputy Chief of Mission in London; and director of Instituto Rio Branco, the Brazilian Diplomatic School. An ambassador, he is presently the Consul General of Brazil in Chicago.

Presentations:

Present-Day Brazil
11:00 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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J. Christopher Brown:

 J. Christopher Brown:

J. Christopher Brown is an associate professor of geography and environmental studies at the University of Kansas. He is also director of the environmental studies program. His work spans the areas of ecology and biogeography, political ecology, and moral geography. Current projects include studies of environmental governance along the mechanized agricultural frontier of Amazonia; social movements, civil society, and the environment; and farmers’ land-use decisions vis-à-vis changes in the bio-fuel economy in Brazil and the U.S. Great Plains. Among his publications are articles in the Journal of Biogeography, Comparative Political Studies, Latin American Research Review, Political Geography, Progress in Development Studies, Ambio, the Professional Geographer, and Geoforum.

 

Presentations:

Soybean Production in the Amazon: Are We Eating the Rainforest?
10:00 a.m., Friday, Sept. 10, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Decentralization of Development in the Brazilian Amazon
12:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 10, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Richard Miller:

 Richard Miller:

Richard Miller earned a Ph.D. in music theory from Catholic University of America in 2006, where he now teaches theory, ear-training, and guitar. He also holds a master of music degree in guitar performance from the Manhattan School of Music. Professor Miller was born in Rio de Janeiro to an American father and a Brazilian mother and moved frequently in Brazil, the United States, and Puerto Rico. He has become well known in the Washington, D.C., area for his performances of both classical guitar music and popular Brazilian and Latin-American music and has traveled extensively for concerts and recitals in the United States and Latin America. His dissertation, The Guitar in the Brazilian Choro, will soon be published by VDM Verlag and will be available for purchase at amazon.com.

Presentations:

African Rhythms in Brazilian Popular Music
11:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 4, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Performance of Brazilian Choro, Samba, and Baião
11:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 4, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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David Grann:

 David Grann:

David Grann is a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine and the author of the books The Devil and Sherlock Holmes: Tales of Murder, Madness, and Obsession and The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon. His first book, The Lost City of Z, was a #1 New York Times bestseller and has been translated into more than 25 languages. Shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize, the book was chosen as one of the best books of 2009 by the New York Times, The Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, Bloomberg, Publishers Weekly, and the Christian Science Monitor. The book is currently being developed into a movie by Brad Pitt’s Plan B production company. His stories have appeared in several Best American writing anthologies, and he has written for The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and The New Republic.

Presentations: 

The Search For the Lost City of Z
9:30 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 23, 2010
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

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Bryan McCann:

 Bryan McCann:

Bryan McCann is an associate professor of history and director of Brazilian studies at Georgetown University. He is the author of Throes of Democracy: Brazil since 1989 (Zed Press, 1989) and Hello, Hello Brazil: Popular Music in the Making of Modern Brazil (Duke University Press, 2004), as well as numerous articles on culture and history in Brazil. His work offers a nuanced interpretation of popular cultural production firmly grounded in political and economic analysis. He is currently completing a book on conflict over urban space in Rio de Janeiro from the 1960s through the present.

Presentations:

Samba and Brazillian National Identity
9:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 4, 2010
Taylor Performing Arts Center
Admission: free

Performance of Brazilian Choro, Samba, and Baião
11:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 4, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Rebecca Gallemore:

 Rebecca Gallemore:

Rebecca Gallemore is an assistant professor in the Teacher Education Department at Missouri Southern State University. She teaches a variety of courses such as Language Arts, Comparative Education, Classroom Management, Foundations of Early Childhood, and Microteaching. She has been a tour leader for overseas travel with students from Joplin High School, University of Arkansas, and MSSU. She has traveled to 25 countries and is looking forward to the spring Comparative Education and Cultures trip to Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand.

Presentations:

Rio di Janeiro - Cidade Maravilhosa!
1:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 14, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Jim Lile: Dr. Jim Lile:

Dr. Jim Lile is an associate professor of theatre and head of the Theatre Department and Art Department at Missouri Southern State University. He is co-editor of The Texas Theatre Journal to which he has contributed editorials and various other pieces. Dr. Lile teaches Theatre Appreciation and Theatre History. His primary research interest lies in 19th century American theatre and drama.

Presentations:

The Colossus of Rio
10:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Gabriel Ondetti:

 Dr. Gabriel Ondetti:

Gabriel Ondetti is an associate professor of political science at Missouri State University. He is a specialist in Brazilian and Latin American politics. Most of his research examines the struggle for agrarian reform in Brazil. His book, Land, Protest, and Politics: The Landless Movement and the Struggle for Agrarian Reform in Brazil, was published in 2008 by Penn State University Press. He has also published articles on this topic in Latin American Perspectives, Latin American Politics & Society and Politics & Policy. Dr. Ondetti is currently working on two research projects, one that examines Brazil’s role in international trade negotiations, and another that explores the evolution of taxation and social spending policies in Latin America. He has a B.A. in English from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.A. in Latin American studies from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Presentations:

Taming 'Savage Capitalism': Brazil's Struggle against Poverty and Inequality
9:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

Brazil on the World Stage: Foreign Policies of an Emerging Power
11:00 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Dr. Andrew Horowitz:

 Dr. Andrew Horowitz:

Andrew Horowitz is a professor of economics at the Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas. He received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Horowitz has served as an analyst for the Congressional Budget Office, taught at Vanderbilt University, been a Fulbright Scholar in Brazil, and consulted for The Inter-American Development Bank and the Brazilian Ministry of Education. He has published numerous articles in the top academic economic journals, including: The American Economic Review, The International Economic Review, The Journal of International Economics, and The Journal of Development Economics. Professor Horowitz has accompanied and guided a U.S. Congressional trade mission to Brazil; he also created and leads the Walton College Study Abroad Program in Brazil.

 

Presentations: 

Doing Business in Brazil - Surviving Bureaucracy and Bridging Cultures
10:00 a.m., Friday, Oct. 22, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

The Future is Now - Brazil, 21st Century Superpower
12:00 p.m., Friday, Oct. 22, 2010
Corley Auditorium in Webster Hall
Admission: free

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Kelsey Jensen:

 Kelsey Jensen:

Kelsey Jensen, a sophomore international studies major, spent a year in Brazil teaching English and studying Portuguese at Colegio de Campus in Salvador.

Presentations and Events:

Learn One Endeavor for One New Culture: Impressions of the Brazilian Culture from an MSSU Student
E-mail kelsey.jensen@yahoo.com

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