MSSU Film Festival

About US

All films presented at 7 p.m., Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall on the campus of Missouri Southern State University. (See Map)

No admission is charged.

For half a century our organization, now known as Missouri Southern Film Society, has programmed significant classic and world cinema.

Program notes are distributed before each screening and participation in informal discussions is encouraged. These promote greater perception and help stimulate a critical appreciation of the films.

Our first program, the British comedy The Belles of St. Trinian's, was shown Oct. 15, 1962 and we continue to explore creative traditional and new wave movements. For the last nine years films representing a specific country have been shown as an activity of our themed-semesters. Each fall the MSSU Institute of International Studies presents films that focus on the country featured during the themed semester. The Society's continuing offerings of films from other countries, recently restored and transferred to DVD format, are shown in the spring.

For more information call (417) 673-1261 or send an email.

 

MSSU International Film Festival

Egypt Film Events (Fall 2011):

Continuing Film Society Series (Spring 2012):

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Terrorism and the Kebab Terrorism and the Kebab

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1992

105 minutes

A man named Ahmed, portrayed by the popular Egyptian comic actor, Adil Imam, is mistaken for a terrorist because he has accidentally taken “hostages” while simply trying to negotiate the bureaucratic tangle of transferring his child from one school to another. Ultimately he satisfies the “demands” of his hostages not only for a kebab lunch but for other things they need.

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Everything is FineEverything is Fine

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1937

100 minutes

In what has been called the “ultimate screwball comedy,” Nagib al-Rihani, “Egypt’s Buster Keaton,” portrays an office assistant who is supposed to deposit the company payroll and ends up impersonating a maharaja.

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A Man in Our House A Man in Our House

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1961

159 minutes

Omar Sharif, just before his sensational Western debut in Lawrence of Arabia, plays a revolutionary student who seeks safety and protection in the home of an apolitical middle-class family in the days leading up to the July 1952 revolution.

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Al Karnak Al Karnak

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1975

143 minutes

Based on a novel by the Nobel Prize-winning novelist Naguib Mahfouz, this deeply human film probes the impact of repressive government policies on a group of activist students who gather at the Karnak Café in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The film contains modestly presented sexual situations and scenes of police interrogation and torture.

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Cultural Film/Film Sakafi Cultural Film/Film Sakafi

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

2001

120 minutes

In this recent popular comedy, a group of young men attempt, with increasing frustration, to find the equipment and the “safe” place they need to watch a “cultural” (i.e., pornographic) film on video. Their quest takes them most of a day and all over Cairo. Though the film implies that the “cultural” film contains scenes with sexual content, the film itself has virtually none.

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Cairo Station Cairo Station

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1958

86 minutes

This classic, early film by the most internationally acclaimed Egyptian director, Youssef Chahine, opened a new world of realism in Egyptian cinema with its gritty portrayal of rough life in and around the Cairo railway station, centering on a crippled street vendor (played by Chahine) and a beautiful lemonade seller.

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The Land The Land

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1969

130 minutes

In what has been called “the best Egyptian film ever,” Youssef Chahine focuses on the struggles of the residents of a rural village against a wealthy, local landowner and government forces that want to deprive the farmers of their land in order to build an unnecessary road. This uncompromising film, which stands comparison with The Grapes of Wrath, features a range of rich characters caught in tragic situations, unforgettably and searingly portrayed.

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Alexandria…Why? Alexandria…Why?

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

1979

133 minutes

Marking the beginning of a later, somewhat autobiographical turn in Youssef Chahine’s career, this sensitive, humane, often touching and sometimes comic coming-of-age story follows a talented 18-year-old student who dreams of becoming a film actor in Hollywood while confronted with the daily realities of World War II in the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria.

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The Yacoubian Building The Yacoubian Building

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

2006

162 minutes

The most widely known recent Egyptian film centers on the lives of residents of a once-elegant apartment building that has become a “haven for corruption, prostitution, drugs, fundamentalism and other distractions, creating a vibrant and complex picture of contemporary Egypt” (Facets).

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Continuing Film Society Series (Spring 2012)

Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012

Catsplay (Macskajatek)  (Hungary, 1974)

In this insightful drama, director Karoly Makk exhibits his extraordinary skills at drawing emotionally compelling performances from his talented leads.  A widowed teacher living alone finds her quiet life and relationship with an old flame upset by a chance meeting with a woman she knew long ago.  This story of two sisters who cast wistful glances back at their lives but still believe in hope and love, earned an Academy Award Nomination for Best Foreign Film in 1974.

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Tuesday, March 13

Samson  (Poland, 1961)

Andrzej Wajda, one of the finest of award winning directors, depicts a man’s search for meaning in the midst of brutality. Set in Warsaw just before and during World War II, this is a profound psychological study of a man who accidentally kills a schoolmate and is imprisoned.  Although he escapes during an air raid, he is unhappy as a free man and is tormented by the constant fear of being discovered.  Only when he has the chance to join the Resistance movement against the Nazis does he find some purpose in living.  This powerful film makes extraordinary use of naturalistic symbols.

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Tuesday, March 27

Adelheid  (Czechoslovakia, 1969)

The master visual poet Frantisek Vlacil created this emotional film of doomed love set after the wartime liberation of Czechoslovakia in 1945.  A returning airman is assigned to manage a manor once owned by a German family.  There he is attracted to the daughter of a war criminal who is now reduced to servant status in the estate.  But history works against them and he is caught between his love for the girl and his patriotic duty.  Labeled “…haunting…” (Los Angeles Times) and a “…powerful, disturbing tale of love…” (Santa Fe New Mexican).  It won Vlacil the Career Award at the Pilsen Festival.

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Tuesday, April 10

Border Street  (Ulica Graniczna)  (Poland, 1948)

Based on the circumstances surrounding the Warsaw Ghetto uprising of 1943, this authentic recreation follows a small, heroic band of Jews who chose to die fighting rather than face deportation to Auschwitz or Treblinka .  It reveals the plight of an old tailor and a doctor who try to save his daughter and others.  Aleksander Ford’s film is at once a compelling drama and a page out of history. It was a prize winner at the 1948 Venice Festival and is recognized as one of the best Polish films of the postwar period.

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