MSSU Film Festival

About US

All films presented at 7 p.m., Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall on the campus of Missouri Southern State University. (See Map)

No admission is charged.

For half a century our organization, now known as Missouri Southern Film Society, has programmed significant classic and world cinema.

Program notes are distributed before each screening and participation in informal discussions is encouraged. These promote greater perception and help stimulate a critical appreciation of the films.

Our first program, the British comedy The Belles of St. Trinian's, was shown Oct. 15, 1962 and we continue to explore creative traditional and new wave movements. For the last nine years films representing a specific country have been shown as an activity of our themed-semesters. Each fall the MSSU Institute of International Studies presents films that focus on the country featured during the themed semester. The Society's continuing offerings of films from other countries, recently restored and transferred to DVD format, are shown in the spring.

For more information call (417) 673-1261 or send an email.

 

MSSU International Film Festival

Brazil Semester Film Events (Fall 2010):

Continuing Film Society Series (Spring 2011):

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Blindness (Ensaio Sobre Cequeira) (2008)

9:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010
Residence Halls Courtyard
Admission: free

Directed by Fernando Meirelles. A doctor’s wife becomes the only person with the ability to see in a town where everyone is struck with a mysterious case of sudden blindness. She feigns illness in order to take care of her husband as her surrounding community breaks down into chaos. Nominated for the Golden Palm at the 2008 Cannes Festival.

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Black Orpheus (Orfeu Negro) (1958)

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21, 2010
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Director Marcel Camus’ classic, dynamic retelling of the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice, set in Rio de Janeiro during carnival time. Winner of the Grand Prize at Cannes and Oscar for Best Foreign Film.

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Entranced Earth (Terra em Transe) (1966)

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Highly controversial when it appeared, the film explores the consequences of political commitment through the story of a young poet and journalist whose lover persuades him to get involved in politics. The film’s notable Brazilian director, Glauber Rocha, called Terra em Transe “my most important film…a more profound expression of my life.”

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Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) (1977)

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2011
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

 

A young widow is caught between her respectable new husband and her more exciting but dead first husband. Facets called the film “funny, sexy and intoxicating!” Directed by Bruno Barreto.

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Bye Bye Brazil (Bye Bye Brasil) (1980)

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

What has been called “one of the most original and entertaining films of recent years, Bye Bye Brazil follows a traveling sideshow as it makes its way over 9000 miles of rural and backwoods Brazil. Directed by Carlos Diegues.

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Central Station

7:00 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

 

Featuring an outstanding performance by Fernando Montenegro, this very popular film focuses on the unlikely friendship that develops between a lonely, older woman and an orphan boy she encounters at Rio de Janeiro’s central train station. Directed by Walter Salles.

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City of God

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2010
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Director Fernando Meirelles’ brutal, gripping portrait of life over three decades in the slums of Rio de Janeiro and how gang warfare there transforms the lives of children, many portrayed by nonprofessional actors. Perhaps the most creative and arresting film to come from Brazil in the last twenty years.

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Two Sons of Francisco (Dos Filhos de Francisco) (2005)

7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010
Cornell Auditorium in Plaster Hall
Admission: free

Brazil’s highest grossing film in decades traces the struggle and triumph of two brothers who become an outstanding country music duo.

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Continuing Film Society Series (Spring 2012)

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Germany, Pale Mother (Deutschland Bleiche Mutter) (West Germany, 1980)

This account of writer-director Helma Sanders-Brahms’ childhood and emotionally powerful love story, traces the history of World War II Germany from an extremely personal and distinctly feminist point of view. A newly-married young woman sees her husband sent off to the Eastern front. She and her daughter struggle for survival throughout the war, only to face a husband who, when he returns, wreaks havoc on the family. Labeled “A brave film, it demands a brave audience" (Village Voice) and a "...sharply observed autobiographical drama ..." (The Times, London)

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Tuesday, March 15, 2011

The Joke (Zert) (Czechoslovakia, 1968)

Directed by Jaromil Jires of the Czech New Wave. In Stalinist Czechoslovakia of the 1950’s, a professor is expelled from his university and sentenced to prison for sending a ribald postcard to his girlfriend. Upon his release, he plots to exact his revenge by seducing the wife of the official who turned him in. This fierce satire was subsequently banned and shelved for years. Author and critic Amos Vogel called this film “possibly the most shattering indictment of totalitarianism to come out of a Communist country…a chilling examination of a corrupt society.”

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Tuesday, March 29, 2011

The Lady with the Dog (Dama s sobachkoi) (Russia, 1960)

Based on Anton Chekhov’s short story of the same name, this romantic drama is a bittersweet portrait of a doomed love affair between two lonely people, both married, around the turn of the century. Josef Heifitz’s sensitive direction is a superb visualization of the restrained tone and atmosphere of desperation of the legendary writer, conveying with extreme subtlety the surroundings and social ambience of Yalta in summer and Moscow in winter. The film won the Prix de la Millieure Participation award at the 1960 Cannes Festival, for its “lofty humanism and high artistic standard.”

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Tuesday, April 12, 2011

The Last Stage (Ostatni Etap) (Poland, 1948)

 

Director Wanda Jakubowska and scriptwriter Gerda Schneider were among inmates at the Auschwitz concentration camp who experienced the last stage of the final journey to the gas chambers and crematoria. Filmed on location in the female section of the camp, it tells the story of one woman’s attempt to survive until she is eventually rescued. After it won the Golden Lion at the 1948 Venice Festival and subsequent success, it drew attention to the postwar Polish film renaissance.

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