English & Philosophy

Dr. Joy Dworkin

Assistant Professor, English

Office Number, Building: Kuhn Annex 104

Telephone: 625-9647

On-campus Email: Dworkin-J@mssu.edu

First Semester at Missouri Southern: Fall 1991

Education:

  • Bachelor's (B.A.), Reed College
  • Master's (M.A.), University of Michigan
  • Master's (M.F.A.), University of Michigan
  • Doctorate (Ph.D.), University of Michigan

Recent Publications: poems in Beloit Poetry Journal, Paris Review, English Journal, Epiphany; Translations of poetry in Conjunctions

Before coming to Missouri Southern, I earned a BA in Russian at Reed College in Portland, Oregon and a PhD in Slavic Literature from The University of Michigan. My doctoral concentration was in early 20th century Russian poetry, but as a graduate student I also enjoyed studying the 19th century Russian classics as well as dissident writing in the Soviet Union and Eastern/Central Europe. While at the U of M, I completed an MFA in Creative Writing and subsequently taught undergraduate creative writing courses there as a Lecturer. I have published a number of poems in a variety of literary outlets.

I grew up mostly in upstate New York. However, when I was fourteen, my family lived in Spain for a year. Ever since then, I have been interested in travel and in cultures and arts from around the world. I have spent summers studying in the Soviet Union, Poland, India, and Russia, and my personal travels have taken me throughout Europe and, most recently, to Peru. One related professional interest is literary translation. I have published translations from Russian and Polish, as well as a scholarly article that addresses the problem of translation.

As a child and youth I was involved in music—playing flute and piano, and dance—a little ballet, but especially modern dance. Since 1999, I have been in an African marimba band, which has performed throughout the Four-States as well as, occasionally, more distantly. This interest grew out of an African dance class and has since led me to study an indigenous Shona instrument, the mbira dzaVadzimu.

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